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Book & Film Reviews

Results (1769)

Review

Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012

  As Nancy Townshend writes in the preface of Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012: “At one time, the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains, and Selkirk Mountains existed as a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

Solitudes of the Workplace: Women in Universities

The essays in Solitudes of the Workplace examine the university as a workplace. The authors use the concept of solitude to examine women’s various experiences as workers in universities. A key premise of the book...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Review

Toshiko

I haven’t read a comic book since childhood, save for the Classics Comic version of “Romeo and Juliet,” which seemed a short-cut to studying that play in high school. Co-incidentally, Kluckner’s book, more properly described...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Human Rights in Canada: A History

Human Rights in Canada: A History is a comprehensive survey of the checkered human rights pattern in this country. Dominique Clément writes of a country that in its infancy and youth had a minimal respect...

Review by Larry Hannant


Review

Empowering Electricity: Co-operatives, Sustainability, and Power Sector Reform in Canada

Empowering Electricity is a detailed examination of the political and social economy of electricity co-operatives and power sector reform in Canada. The co-operative movement is commonly, and rightfully, viewed as a model of grassroots organization...

Review by Nichole Dusyk


Review

Resource Communities in a Globalizing Region: Development, Agency, and Contestation in Northern British Columbia

From the Northern Gateway Pipeline Inquiry, to the Tsilhqot’in land claim decision, to the proposed Site C dam, northern British Columbia has made regular front page news appearances in recent years. In Resource Communities in...

Review by Hereward Longley


Review

The Royal Fjord: Memories of Jervis Inlet

In The Royal Fjord, Ray Phillips, a long-time resident of the Sunshine Coast, finishes a job his late father started. It is, says Phillips, a book of “many anecdotes [and other stories that] tell some...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

One More Time! The Dal Richards Story

  Local icon Dal Richards passed away on New Year’s Eve 2015. In the tributes that followed and at his memorial, many noted the auspiciousness of his passing. For years, his New Year’s Eve concerts...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Review

Playing for Change: The Continuing Struggle for Sport and Recreation

Rarely does a book cover depict a Canadian athlete with claims to a major role in academic life and advocacy politics, but this is no ordinary cover. The front of Playing for Change depicts young Bruce Kidd,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Review

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

The strength of How Canadians Communicate V: Sports is in its storytelling. Exploring Canadian engagement through sports and the media, the authors demonstrate that a powerful story attracts both spectators and readers. Written from multiple...

Review by Jennifer Anderson


Review

Sustaining the West: Cultural Responses to Canadian Environments

Sustaining the West: Cultural Responses to Canadian Environments is a fascinating set of essays edited by Liza Piper and Lisa Szabo-Jones. Its overall argument is that threats to the environment pose not simply technical or...

Review by John Thistle


Review

The Slow Farm

A memoir, The Slow Farm, focuses largely on the brief period during which Tarn Wilson lived on Texada Island with her American parents and younger sister Rima. Arriving in 1973, the then four-year-old and her...

Review by Connie Brim


Review

Britannia’s Navy, On the West Coast of North America 1812 – 1914

This handsome volume, published in hardback with a blue and white dust-cover (featuring E. P. Bedwell’s 1862 painting of the steam-sloop HMS Plumper on the front and a photograph of HMCS Rainbow in Esquimalt, January...

Review by Alexander Howlett


Review

The Slocan History Series

          Edited by Cole Harris, the Slocan History Series began with four booklets that focus primarily on the mining “boom days” of the 1890s and their long-term effects on the region....

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

During the First World War, 2,845 women enlisted as lieutenant nursing sisters in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) (39), but over the ensuing century their experiences of service have largely gone untold. They comprised...

Review by Sarah Glassford


Review

War-Torn Exchanges: The Lives and Letters of Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes

For four turbulent years (June 1915 to May 1919) Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes served together in the Canadian Army Medical Corps, taking on new administrative and bedside nursing roles in joint postings...

Review by C.M. Haney


Review

Remembered in Bronze and Stone: Canada’s Great War Memorial Statuary

In the two decades following the Great War, Canadian sculptors, architects and stonemasons produced over four thousand war monuments in the form of plaques, shafts, crosses, obelisks, stelae and figurative sculptures. Some were paid for...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 Through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide

Two decades ago, a prominent conservative academic smacked down Canadian university instructors with the provocatively-titled Who Killed Canadian History? J.L. Granatstein’s answer was, in part, social history and the historians who taught it. Social historian...

Review by Larry Hannant