We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (76)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Uninterrupted

Editorial note: Uninterrupted is reviewed here following its role as inspiration for a nightly ‘cinematic spectacle’ on Vancouver’s Cambie Street Bridge during the summer of 2017 (see uninterrupted.ca). Uninterrupted, a film about a very special...

Review by Nick Stanger


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Is the World Wonderful? On Judy Chartrand’s What a Wonderful World

Judy Chartrand: What a Wonderful World on view at the Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art, Vancouver, BC, 19 October 2016 – 26 March 2017. Admittedly, I was confused about where the permanent collection...

Review by Allison Adler


art

Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Complicated Simplicity: Island Life in the Pacific Northwest

Complicated Simplicity is a collection of essays, personal and expository, that explore the nature of living on secluded (non-ferry-serviced) islands within the Southwestern part of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest (and further abroad too)....

Review by Nicholas Stanger


Book Review

When Days Are Long: Nurse in the North

In this book, first published upon her retirement in 1965, Amy Wilson presents a biographical history of her career as a public health nurse in Northern British Columbia and the Yukon during the 1950s and...

Review by Geertje Boschma


Book Review

Where it Hurts

Where it Hurts, by Sarah De Leeuw, is a collection of essays within the genre of creative non-fiction. The vivid essays express loss, trauma and humor. De Leeuw uses complex imagery that takes the reader...

Review by Melinda Kachina Bige


Book Review

Raven Walks Around the World

In Raven Walks Around the World, Henley shares parts of his personal journey of activism, travel, and life long work with Indigenous peoples around the world. Through his stories, Henley illuminates the determination of all...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

At Sea with the Marine Birds of the Raincoast

Caroline Fox presents in the guise of an account of her experiences as a field biologist a wonderful memoir of coastal British Columbia.  Onboard the sailboat Achiever, her job was to survey birds from Vancouver Island to...

Review by Stephen Bocking


Book Review

Kwädąy Dän Ts’inchį: Teachings from Long Ago Person Found

Sometime between 1720 and 1850, late in summer, an eighteen-year-old man was traveling in an icefield in the present-day territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, in what is now Northwestern British Columbia. Well...

Review by Jacob Salmen-Hartley


Book Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Book Review

Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage

“You can get anywhere if you have the time” (106). Kylik Kisoun, an Inuvialuit guide from Inuvik, said this to Brian Castner when Castner, with the help of four friends, canoed the length of the...

Review by Stan Tag


Book Review

The Right Relationship: Reimagining the Implementation of Historical Treaties

In the 1764 Treaty of Niagara, representatives of the British Crown met with a gathering of more than two thousand Indigenous leaders and committed that North American settlement would only proceed with Indigenous consent. At...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Book Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

Everything Shuswap

In 1969, Jim Cooperman arrived in British Columbia from the United States, one of many Vietnam ‘war resisters’ who remade our province in ways that few people yet fully appreciate.  One was in building a...

Review by Michael M’Gonigle


Book Review

Summer of the Horse

Donna Kane’s Summer of the Horse elates and lures readers towards reenchantment, or what deep ecologist Thomas Berry calls “a reverence for the mystery and magic of the earth and the larger universe.” Kane calls...

Review by Shirley A. McDonald


Book Review

Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780-1882

Let us get the quibbling out of the way first, lest it leave a bad taste in our mouths at the end. Cambridge University Press appears to have put little effort into indexing this volume,...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


Book Review

Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel

The Canadian Pacific Railway’s travel literature boasts marvellous scenery, adventure, and extravagance. “You shall see mighty rivers, vast forest, boundless plains, stupendous mountains and wonders innumerable, and you shall see in all in comfort, nay...

Review by Heather Longworth Sjoblom


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Memories of Jack Pickup: Flying Doctor of British Columbia

       Transportation and communication technologies have played an integral role in modernizing British Columbia by reconfiguring possibilities of movement and exchange. As Cole Harris has pointed out in The Resettlement of British Columbia (1997), the...

Review by Bret Edwards


Book Review

The Grande Dames of the Cariboo

Far too little is known about artistic activity in the interior of British Columbia — past and present alike. Julie Fowler seeks to fill this lacuna by examining the lives of two mother-and-daughter artists: Vivien...

Review by Maria Tippett