We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (357)

Book Review

Museums and the Past: Constructing Historical Consciousness

Museums and the Past opens with a statement that “‘museums’ and ‘historical consciousness’ dovetail almost intuitively” (3). I don’t think they do, and this book does not convince me. The editors offer a couple of...

Review by Alan Gordon


Book Review

Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form (50th anniversary edition)

To anyone who is familiar with Northwest Coast art scholarship, it will come as no surprise that Bill Holm’s Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form was published anew 50 years after it was...

Review by Solen Roth


Book Review

Red: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, 2013

The short title of the book – Red – shares its name with the 2013 Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship for Native American Fine Art, which gathered together the work of five notable Indigenous artists: Julie...

Review by Geoffrey Carr


Book Review

The Art of Jeffrey Rubinoff

Jeffrey Rubinoff (1945-2017) is one of the great sculptors in steel of the second half of the twentieth century. In the 1970s and 1980s he exhibited widely in the United States and Canada. Though poised...

Review by Susan Lewis


Book Review

Coded Territories: Tracing Indigenous Pathways in New Media Art

In this fascinating collection, seven Indigenous artists from across Canada illustrate how digital technologies and Indigenous ontologies combine to inform new media theory and practice. In different ways, the contributors demonstrate how digital technologies are...

Review by Rob McMahon


Book Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Book Review

In the Spirit of the Ancestors: Contemporary Northwest Coast Art at the Burke Museum

In the Spirit of the Ancestors celebrates the Burke Museum’s contemporary Northwest Coast art collection. The writers, four academics and four artists, all have strong ties to this Seattle museum, and the artists featured here...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

Listening for the Heartbeat of Being: The Arts of Robert Bringhurst

Poet Robert Bringhurst has been just on the periphery of my attention for many years, and it seems I’ve been in good company. Although he has made a name for himself in some circles (he...

Review by Ceilidh Hart


Book Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School

Bev Sellars’s bestselling memoir, They Called Me Number One, is a personal account of an important part of the colonial history of British Columbia told from a specific region in the province (Cariboo) and from...

Review by Jay Lewyn


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

Canadian State Trials, Volume IV

  The fourth volume of the Osgoode Society’s Canadian State Trials is a critical analysis of the powers, both theoretical and practical, of Canada’s judiciary and political executive, and how Canadian state officials used such...

Review by Scott Eaton


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Volumes 1-6

A portion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) mandate laid out in Schedule N to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement [IRSSA] of 2006 said that the Commission was to “Produce and submit to...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

The Importance of British Material Culture to Historical Archaeologies of the Nineteenth Century

One great irony of historical archaeology is that far more research is done on nineteenth century British material culture overseas than in Britain itself, despite the importance of the Empire and its material culture to...

Review by Douglas E. Ross


Book Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

This is a story of contested authority. Dan Malleck has drawn from legal, medical, newspaper, policy, and pharmacy perspectives to explore the shifting conceptualizations of opium addiction and regulation in nineteenth century Canada. In some...

Review by Erika Dyck