We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (343)

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Crackdown

British Columbia is in year four of a provincial public health emergency declared in response to devastating rates of drug overdose deaths resulting from a toxic, illicit drug supply. As of July 2020, COVID-19 had...

Review by Kendra Milne


epidemics liquor and drugs mental health social services substance use government law public policy

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

When the City Sleeps, We Dream of Disruption: A Review of Lisa Jackson’s Transmissions Exhibition

Lisa Jackson’s exhibition entitled Transmissions premiered at the Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver campus from 6–28 September 2019. This new body of work weaves interdisciplinary themes regarding society, nature, Indigenous languages, and ecological futures. Lisa Jackson is Anishinaabe from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and...

Review by Karlene Harvey


Aboriginal languages environment urbanization

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Chief Supernatural Being with the Big Eyes (2021)

Exploring the creative possibilities offered by augmented reality (AR) technology, Vancouver-based Haida artist Ernest Swanson has teamed up with the Vancouver Mural Festival (VMF) and AR designer Mark Illing to present Chief Supernatural Being with...

Review by April Liu 


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Vancouver: No Fixed Address

What stays with you after watching Charles Wilkinson’s new documentary, Vancouver: No Fixed Address, is its beautiful cinematography. Vancouver’s ideal location at the intersection of the ocean, the mountains, and the sky is captured brilliantly: every shot...

Review by Patricia Wood


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

Winner of the Best Canadian Feature at the 2016 Hot Docs Festival, Nettie Wild’s Konelīne: our land beautiful weaves together stories of humanity’s relationships with industry, the wilderness, and nature in Northwestern British Columbia. Telling...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Book Review

Victoria Unbuttoned: A Red-Light History of BC’s Capital City

Linda J. Eversole’s first book, Stella: Unrepentant Madam, written in 2005, was praised for its academic value and readability. The author continues her exploration of women in the sex trade with Victoria Unbuttoned, profiling ten...

Review by Janet Nicol


Book Review

Against the Current and Into the Light: Performing History and Land in Coast Salish Territories and Vancouver’s Stanley Park

Coast Salish Indigenous people never ceded their lands and resources to settlers and have always asserted their sovereignty. Over time, those assertions have taken various forms: petitions, protests, litigation. There have also been cultural assertions...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Northwest Voices: Language and Culture in the Pacific Northwest

What, if anything, is the socio-linguistic glue that binds together the region often referred to as the Pacific Northwest? When it comes to language and culture, do the peoples of Washington and Oregon in the...

Review by Mark Turin


Book Review

Waterlogged: Examples and Procedures for Northwest Coast Archaeologists

Waterlogged will find its way to the bookshelves of almost every practicing archaeologist in BC. It succeeds in bringing together experience and innovation in a single source. A mix of advice for field archaeologists, empirical research...

Review by Paul A. Ewonus, PhD, RPCA


Book Review

When Days Are Long: Nurse in the North

In this book, first published upon her retirement in 1965, Amy Wilson presents a biographical history of her career as a public health nurse in Northern British Columbia and the Yukon during the 1950s and...

Review by Geertje Boschma


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Shared Histories: Witsuwit’en-Settler Relations in Smithers, British Columbia, 1913-1973

Geographer Tyler McCreary’s book about Witsuwit’en-settler relations in Smithers is a valuable new addition to research and writing on histories of place in settler-colonial contexts. Shared Histories demonstrates how academic work can be integrated with local...

Review by Molly Malone


Book Review

Trans-Pacific Mobilities: The Chinese and Canada

This book examines the trans-Pacific mobility of migrants, products, images and ideas as part of the great global diaspora of Chinese people. As China has modernised and globalised, aspects of its self-transformation have been exported...

Review by David Ley


Book Review

Cornelius O’Keefe: the Life, Loves, and Legacy of an Okanagan Rancher

Cornelius O’Keefe was one of a small group of pioneer Okanagan ranchers who managed, in the late nineteenth century, to accumulate land, wealth, and influence. His rags-to-riches story was made possible by a combination of...

Review by Duane Thomson


Book Review

The Hundred-Year Trek: A History of Student Life at UBC

To borrow an old joke, institutional histories can often be the sofa beds of historical writing. Neither good as a sofa nor as a bed, institutional histories can often find themselves trapped between academic and...

Review by Dale M. McCartney


Book Review

The Last Suffragist Standing: The Life and Times of Laura Marshall Jamieson

Veronica Strong-Boag is one of Canada’s most distinguished women’s historians.  One of the major themes of her publishing career has been Canadian women’s struggle for the vote. Strong-Boag’s expertise in the field is very much...

Review by Lynne Marks