We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (523)

Book Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Book Review

The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd

Peter Busby’s The Life and Art of Jack Akroyd is the eighth and latest book in the Unheralded Artists Series presented by Mother Tongue Publishing. The series as a whole makes a significant contribution to...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

Sonia: The Life of Bohemian, Rancher and Artist Sonia Cornwall, 1919-2006

Challenged to name women artists of British Columbia of the twentieth century, most people would stop at Emily Carr. While the list of both First Nations and settler women artists of British Columbia is impressively...

Review by Kerry Mason


Book Review

The Power of Feasts: From Prehistory to Present

In the Power of Feasts, Hayden, an SFU archaeologist, provides a “theoretical synthesis” of the history of feasting, explains the theory of its influence on human societies over time, and argues that feasting contributed to...

Review by Deidre Cullon


Book Review

Canadian Pacific: The Golden Age of Travel

The Canadian Pacific Railway’s travel literature boasts marvellous scenery, adventure, and extravagance. “You shall see mighty rivers, vast forest, boundless plains, stupendous mountains and wonders innumerable, and you shall see in all in comfort, nay...

Review by Heather Longworth Sjoblom


Book Review

Liberal Hearts and Coronets: The Lives and Times of Ishbel Marjoribanks Gordon and John Campbell Gordon, the Aberdeens

Veronica Strong-Boag announces at the outset of her latest book that “Lords and ladies are rarely in fashion for critical scholars or democratic activists. This is unfortunate” (3). Thankfully she decided to take on Ishbel...

Review by Carolyn MacHardy


Book Review

Watershed Moments: A Pictorial History of Courtenay and District

Those who would wish to time-travel to the Comox Valley of the First World War era need only to walk the streets of today’s Courtenay downtown core. There they will encounter numerous large publicly-displayed photographs...

Review by Dan Hinman-Smith


Book Review

Maritime Command Pacific: The Royal Canadian Navy’s West Coast Fleet in the Early Cold War

This welcome new study concerns the operations of Canada’s west coast fleet in the two decades after the Second World War. Soon after 1945, defence policy came to be dominated by Canada’s contributions to NATO...

Review by Jan Drent


Book Review

The Literary Storefront: The Glory Years: Vancouver’s Literary Centre 1978-1985

Few bookstores figure prominently in modern literary history. Shakespeare and Company in Paris, once frequented by Joyce, Stein, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway, and City Lights in San Francisco, made famous by Ginsberg and Kerouac, are shrines...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Book Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Book Review

Indigenous Women, Work, and History 1940-1980

Historian Patrick Wolfe has foregrounded the contradictory condition of Indigenous labour within Euro-American settlement by arguing that mythic narratives of settler diligence coexisted with a heavy reliance on colonized Indigenous labour. As he observes in...

Review by Carol Williams


Book Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order aims to give voice to street-based sex workers in urban Canada, in particular Indigenous women who face intersecting stigma associated with sex work, racism, and...

Review by Cecilia Benoit


Book Review

From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of Metis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-first Centuries

Gerhard Ens and Joe Sawchuck’s co-written volume From New Peoples to New Nations approaches historical and contemporary Métis identity from a perspective that is uncommon and even contested among Indigenous histories. From a social constructionist...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Book Review

The Importance of British Material Culture to Historical Archaeologies of the Nineteenth Century

One great irony of historical archaeology is that far more research is done on nineteenth century British material culture overseas than in Britain itself, despite the importance of the Empire and its material culture to...

Review by Douglas E. Ross


Book Review

Naturalists at Sea: From Dampier to Darwin

Books by Glyn Williams are always a delight. He is one the foremost historians of European voyages of exploration to the Pacific and the Arctic and has a rare and enviable ability to bring his...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

A Nation in Conflict: Canada and the Two World Wars

In the practice of military history, historians have tended to examine conflicts independently of each other, separating them out from other conflicts and from broader social currents and non-military events. Conflicts are often treated individually,...

Review by Jonathan Weier