We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (149)

Book Review

Authentic Indians: Episodes of Encounter from the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast

Authentic Indians examines the pressure exerted on a minority to conform to an ideal that the majority defined by another ideal – in short, two abstractions played off one another. Paige Raibmon calls this a...

Review by Brian Dippie


Book Review

From a Victorian Garden: Creating the Romance of a Bygone Age Right in Your Own Backyard

GARDENS ARE EPHEMERAL, constantly changing and easily lost after only a few years of neglect. The Point Ellice House in Victoria, British Columbia, is an exceptional historic site where the gardens, with original, plantings now...

Review by Brenda Peterson


Book Review

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life

Brian Brett’s book certainly has a catchy title. Even better, the book lives up to it, providing a unique interpretation of the dying art of the family farm, which has been a common institution in...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Book Review

Evergreen Playland: A Road Trip through British Columbia

Evergreen Playland is the dvd version of the movie of the same name that was part of the exhibition “Free Spirits: Stories of You, Me and BC,” held at the Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM) in...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

The Pacific Muse: Exotic Femininity and the Colonial Pacific

In their recent edited collection, Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History (2005), Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton call for a renewed focus on gender as a category of historical analysis, positioning “the...

Review by Frances Steel


Book Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey


Book Review

Outside In: A Political Memoir

Outside In can be read and enjoyed as a straightforward memoir of Libby Davies’ remarkable career as an activist and elected official.  It traces her path from her early days working for housing justice in Vancouver’s...

Review by Gord Perks


Book Review

By Law or In Justice

The foundation of Professor Jane Dickson’s book, By Law Or in Justice, is her work as a Commissioner for the Indian Specific Claims Commission, from 2002 to 2009. The Commission itself endured from 1991 to...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Chinuk Wawa: Kakwa nsayka ulman-tilixam ɬaska munk-kəmtəks nsayka/As Our Elders Teach Us To Speak It

In an obscure 1978 dissertation, a linguist named Samuel Johnson demonstrated that most of the countless Chinook Jargon lexica compiled over two hundred years form a few distinct lineages.[1] Joining the ranks of definitive dictionaries...

Review by Dave Robertson


Book Review

With Good Intentions: Euro-Canadian and Aboriginal Relations in Colonial Canada

We might as well name the elephant in the room. The editors did. The book’s first sentence, back cover, and promotional material all imply a fear that it will be received as “an apologist text”...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Book Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Book Review

Indigenous Women and Work: From Labor to Activism

Indigenous Women and Work, edited by Carol Williams, consists of seventeen essays that examine the history of indigenous women and wage labour in Canada, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. The object of these...

Review by Loraine Littlefield


Book Review

Conversations with a Dead Man: The Legacy of Duncan Campbell Scott

Mark Abley was understandably alarmed when an impeccably dressed apparition appeared in his living room claiming to be Duncan Campbell Scott. An accomplished and respected poet, Scott spent over fifty years working in Canada’s Department of...

Review by Keith D. Smith


Book Review

Up Chute Creek: An Okanagan Idyll

In the early 1970s, Melody Hessing and her husband Jay Lewis bought acreage in the south Okanagan near Naramata. They called their property the Granite Farm. They were idealists, hoping to build a house and...

Review by Theresa Kishkan


Book Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

Edenbank: The Story of a Canadian Pioneer Farm

ALLEN WELLS, who came west from Upper Canada for the gold rush, stayed to farm, establishing Edenbank, one of the earliest and largest farms in the Chilliwack Valley. As new settlers arrived, he encouraged “the...

Review by Morag Maclachlan


Book Review

Emily Carr: Collected

Two weeks after Emily Carr’s death on 3 March 1945, former Group of Seven artist, Lawren Harris, travelled from his home in Vancouver to Victoria. As the artistic executor of Carr’s estate it fell upon...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Book Review

Exalted Subjects: Studies in the Making of Race and Nation in Canada

This is an interesting and provocative book that will motivate readers to rethink the role of the state in directing and managing a multicultural society. Exalted Subjects is divided into a number of sections labelled...

Review by Frances Henry


Book Review

Nechako Country: In the Footsteps of Bert Irvine

This personal history is written in concise and readable prose. It is an account of the life of Bert Irvine, an oil worker, soldier, carpenter, trapper, and wilderness guide who chose to live close to nature....

Review by James Tirrul-Jones


Book Review

Early in the Season: A British Columbia Journal

In the summer of 1968, aspiring American novelist Edward Hoagland spent seven weeks in the BC bush, interviewing locals, listening to stories, exploring highways and byways, and chronicling his experiences. He was gathering material for...

Review by Jonathan Peyton