We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (247)

Book Review

Comrades and Critics: Women, Literature, and the Left in 1930s Canada

Canada’s best-known female literary writers from the 1930s are all closely associated with British Columbia: activist wordsmith Dorothy Livesay, then a member of the Communist Party, who first moved to Vancouver in 1936; Anne Marriott,...

Review by Carole Gerson


Book Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Book Review

Evergreen Playland: A Road Trip through British Columbia

Evergreen Playland is the dvd version of the movie of the same name that was part of the exhibition “Free Spirits: Stories of You, Me and BC,” held at the Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM) in...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Two Houses Half-Buried in Sand: Oral Traditions of the Hul’q’umi’num Coast Salish of Kuper Island and Vancouver Island

Huy tseep q’u, ah siem In a period marred by unemployment and economic hardships, Beryl Mildred Cryer, a Chemainus housewife, mother, and part-time journalist, set out to introduce the world to the oral traditions of...

Review by Sarah Morales


Book Review

Encyclopedia of Literature in Canada

THE TASK APPEARS straightforward – in this case, to read W.H. New’s monumental Encyclopedia ofLiterature in Canada for information on BC writing. There is, usefully, an entry on British Columbia (unsigned, meaning “written by New”):...

Review by Richard Lane


Book Review

The Half-Lives of Pat Lowther

Thirty years ago, my husband and I were having dinner at the Da Tandoor restaurant in Victoria with the incomplete executive of the League of Canadian Poets. All eyes were on the door. Would Pat...

Review by Linda Rogers


Book Review

Always Someone to Kill the Doves: A Life of Sheila Watson

Like Sheila Watson’s seminal – and quintessentially British Columbian – novel, The Double Hook, F.T. Flahiff’s book takes both its title and its epigraph from a particularly dramatic and thematically relevant moment in its text....

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Book Review

Corresponding Influence: Selected Letters of Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth

This wonderful collection of letters describes a special friend ship between Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth between 1940 and 1945. Carr was already recognized as a distinguished artist, but she had just begun to write...

Review by Sandra Djwa


Book Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


Book Review

Marine Life of the Pacific Northwest: A Photographic Encyclopedia of Invertebrates, Seaweeds and Selected Fishes

This book is a self-confessed labour of love, and it took the authors twenty-five years working in their spare time to complete it. Beautifully produced and reasonably priced, it has over 1,700 original colour photographs...

Review by Tony Pitcher


Book Review

In Plain Sight: Reflections on Life in Downtown Eastside Vancouver

As the trial of the serial killer ac cused of murdering women from the Downtown Eastside continues, the Woodward’s building on Hastings Street is turned into luxury condominiums, and the 2010 Olympics draw closer, the...

Review by Lara Campbell


Book Review

Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas

In 1999 a small group of Salt Spring Island activists decided to mark the coming millennium by inventorying and mapping the unique resources of their island home. Inspired by bioregional writing and mapping projects in...

Review by Coll Thrush


Book Review

Dream City: Vancouver and the Global Imagination

Dream City. The title is captivating, but what does it mean? Lance Berelowitz’s book about changes in the urban design and planning of Vancouver opens and closes by briefly discussing the phrase “dream city,” but...

Review by Lawrence McCann


Book Review

Songhees Pictorial: A History of the Songhees People as Seen by Outsiders, 1790-1912

This is a wonderful addition to the history of Aboriginal peoples in British Columbia and Canada. It is unusual because it takes images as the starting point and valuable because the people upon whom it...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

The Old Red Shirt: Pioneer Poets of British Columbia

THE TITLE OF The Old Red Shirt comes from one of the poems that Yvonne Mearns Klan collects in this wonderful book. The poem in question is by Rebecca Gibbs, a black woman who had established...

Review by W.H. New


Book Review

Edenbank: The Story of a Canadian Pioneer Farm

ALLEN WELLS, who came west from Upper Canada for the gold rush, stayed to farm, establishing Edenbank, one of the earliest and largest farms in the Chilliwack Valley. As new settlers arrived, he encouraged “the...

Review by Morag Maclachlan


Book Review

Starbuck Valley Winter

YOU WON’T FIND many kids like Don Morgan these days. The plucky protagonist of this reissued children’s novel is a sixteen-year-old who hunts avidly, builds a waterwheel-driven pump to supply the farmhouse with water, and dreams of...

Review by Arn Keeling


Book Review

Launching History: The Saga of Burrard Dry Dock

IN 1894, ON THE SHORES of False Creek, Alfred “Andy” Wallace began what would become the largest shipbuilding conglomerate on the West Coast of Canada. Specializing in wooden fishing boats, Wallace soon diversified into wooden...

Review by Andrew Hildred


Book Review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

Review by Margaret Prang


Book Review

National Visions, National Blindness: Canadian Art and Identities in the 1920s

Leslie Dawn makes an ambitious contribution to a hotly debated topic of Canadian cultural history – the role of the visual arts in the formation of the image of a modern Canadian nation. The title’s...

Review by Gerta Moray