We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (289)

Book Review

Christy Clark: Behind the Smile

According to Judi Tyabji this is “not an authorized biography. In fact, it’s not really a biography at all because she’s still premier.” Rather, it is “a book about Premier Clark written by someone who...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Red: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, 2013

The short title of the book – Red – shares its name with the 2013 Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship for Native American Fine Art, which gathered together the work of five notable Indigenous artists: Julie...

Review by Geoffrey Carr


Book Review

Working Mothers and the Childcare Dilemma

The history of twentieth century childcare has received scant attention from historians in Canada. Lisa Pasolli’s compact study of childcare debates in British Columbia from the 1900s through the Harper era reveals what a historian...

Review by Esyllt W. Jones


Book Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Book Review

Conrad Kain: Letters from a Wandering Mountain Guide, 1906-1933

Few figures in the history of western Canadian mountaineering are held in such high regard as Conrad Kain. Arriving in Banff in 1909 to work for the young Alpine Club of Canada (ACC), Kain came...

Review by David A. Rossiter


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

A Nation in Conflict: Canada and the Two World Wars

In the practice of military history, historians have tended to examine conflicts independently of each other, separating them out from other conflicts and from broader social currents and non-military events. Conflicts are often treated individually,...

Review by Jonathan Weier


Book Review

Governing Transboundary Waters: Canada, the United States, and Indigenous Communities

Most of the world’s water basins are transborder. The vast majority of North America’s surface freshwater falls within a border watershed. Indeed, contemporary water governance within just one country is already complex enough — overlaying...

Review by Daniel Macfarlane


Book Review

Transforming Provincial Politics: The Political Economy of Canada’s Provinces and Territories in the Neoliberal Era

Provincial specialists can have crowded bookshelves. Because good material is dispersed and rare, many things grace my shelves “just in case.” But this anthology arrives just in time — and I will work it hard...

Review by Jamie Lawson


Book Review

No Regrets: Counter-culture and Anarchism in Vancouver

Since the 1960s, anarchist activism has played a critical role in shaping the radical political landscape of Vancouver. Nevertheless, there are very few scholarly considerations of this history. Instead, most of the work that has...

Review by Eryk Martin


Book Review

Aboriginal Populations: Social, Demographic, and Epidemiological Perspectives

This substantial collection brings interdisciplinary approaches to a range of questions on Aboriginal populations. Aiming to bring about a “comprehensive understanding of the social demographic transformation of the Canadian Aboriginal population” (ix), the contributors review...

Review by Leah Wiener


Book Review

The Answer is Still No: Voices of Pipeline Resistance

The Answer is Still No is a disparate collection of voices united in opposition to Enbridge’s Northern Gateway Pipelines: First Nations activists and hereditary chiefs, members of the environmental movement establishment and those self-consciously on...

Review by Jonathan Peyton