We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (47)

Review

Vanishing British Columbia

Recently, while speeding along West Broadway on a Number 99 bus, the older gentleman sitting next to me mused that so many buildings have been demolished that young people would soon have no idea of...

Review by Jill Wade


Review

Emerging from the Mist: Studies in Northwest Coast Culture History

IN ORGANIZING this collection of papers on late-period Northwest Coast archaeology, R.G. Matson, in his introduction to this edited volume, proposes to make Northwest Coast archaeology more visible in the literature alongside the prominent ethnographic...

Review by Catherine Carlson


Review

The Seattle Bungalow: People and Houses, 1900-1940

As Janet Ore says in the preface to this book, she seeks to overturn many assumptions associated with the bungalow. First, she wishes to reexamine the universality of its Arts and Crafts credentials and assumed...

Review by Sherry McKay


Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

Two Houses Half-Buried in Sand: Oral Traditions of the Hul’q’umi’num Coast Salish of Kuper Island and Vancouver Island

Huy tseep q’u, ah siem In a period marred by unemployment and economic hardships, Beryl Mildred Cryer, a Chemainus housewife, mother, and part-time journalist, set out to introduce the world to the oral traditions of...

Review by Sarah Morales


Review

Houses for All: The Struggle for Social Housing in Vancouver, 1919-50

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 107, Autumn 1995  

Review by Rhodri Liscombe


Review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

Review by Ian Mosby


Review

Selwyn Pullan: Photographing Mid-Century West Coast Modernism

Architecture has been a key site in the evolution of cultural Modernism; the elevator is often cited as an important early Modernist manifestation, and the idea that function creates its own form is a key...

Review by Bill Jeffries


Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Review

The Culture of Flushing: A Social and Legal History of Sewage

In a small, unbuilt parcel of land in East Vancouver surrounded by houses, streets, and Tyee Elementary school, a grassy gulch takes the shape, on closer inspection, of a thin, winding creek bed. At the...

Review by Arn Keeling


Review

Sensational Victoria: Bright Lights, Red Lights, Murders, Ghosts & Gardens

Eve Lazarus is a Vancouver-based freelance writer and self-confessed obsessive blogger about houses and their genealogies. Her passion for history, the arts, old houses, and her community has resulted in three previous books: At Home...

Review by John Adams


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Terrain of Memory: A Japanese Canadian Memorial Project

After the Second World War, most of the Japanese relocated in camps in the interior were sent to Ontario or to Japan, while many of those who remained in British Columbia, largely the elderly or...

Review by Cole Harris


Review

Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley

The cover of this atlas is engaging [1]. The muted grey, black, and red jacket offers an intriguing bird’s-eye view of Vancouver in 1912, looking west from New Westminster to Stanley Park. The heavy antique...

Review by Sally Hermansen


Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

The Sacred Headwaters: The Fight to Save the Stikine, Skeena and Nass

On 17 April 2012, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver announced that his department would follow through on the Federal Conservative Party 2012 budget promise to “streamline” the Environmental Assessment process in Canada. The new process...

Review by Jonathan Peyton


Review

Canadian Counterculture and the Environment

Contemporary environmental debate owes a lot to the counterculture movements of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This is one of the main contentions of Canadian Countercultures and the Environment, the fourth book published under the...

Review by James Rhatigan


Review

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest

The Horticultural Society of London demanded that David Douglas (1799-1834), their employee and North American plant hunter, keep a meticulous journal of his travels. Certainly a better field naturalist than author, Douglas refused to let...

Review by David Brownstein


Review

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen tells the story of a twenty-two-year-old university graduate from Vancouver adapting to life in Williams Lake in the 1980s after he accidentally landed a job there as a community newspaper...

Review by Jenny Clayton