We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (171)

Review

For King and Country: 150 Years of the Royal Westminster Regiment

The setting sun of the British Columbia flag provides a fitting background for the regimental colours of the Royal Westminster Regiment. Authorized in 1863 by Governor James Douglas as the New Westminster Volunteer Rifles, in...

Review by James Wood


Review

Svend Robinson: A Life in Politics

I vividly remember when I first heard the name “Svend Robinson.” I was attending the wedding of a distant cousin I had never met before and have not seen since. At the reception, in Burnaby,...

Review by Joseph Tilley


Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Review

Voyage Through the Past Century

First, a disclaimer: I am not now, nor have I ever been related to Cyril Belshaw. This is pertinent because Cyril — a distinguished University of British Columbia academic whose international notoriety is, shall we...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

The Man Who Saved Vancouver: Major James Skitt Matthews

The publication of Daphne Sleigh’s biography of James Matthews coincides with the seventy-fifth anniversary of the City of Vancouver Archives, which he founded. The work is remarkable for being the first book-length biography of a...

Review by Terry Eastwood


Review

Exalted Subjects: Studies in the Making of Race and Nation in Canada

This is an interesting and provocative book that will motivate readers to rethink the role of the state in directing and managing a multicultural society. Exalted Subjects is divided into a number of sections labelled...

Review by Frances Henry


Review

Canada’s Rights Revolution, Social Movements and Social Change

I am not as confident as is Dominique Clément that “the vast majority of Canadians instinctively see human rights as an inherent good” (9). It might be true that most of us value civil liberties, at...

Review by Shirley Tillotson


Review

Creating a Modern Countryside: Liberalism and Land Resettlement in British Columbia

British Columbia is noteworthy among Canadian provinces for its paucity of good farmland. Too much is rocky, the coastal forests are daunting, a great deal is arid, elevations are too great to support crops, and...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

The Reluctant Land: Society, Space, and Environment in Canada before Confederation

This ambitious book takes up the daunting challenge of surveying Canada’s evolution from the 1500s to the 1870s. Cole Harris’ long and distinguished career as a historical geographer with exceptionally wide-ranging interests provide him with...

Review by Allan Greer


Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Review

Always Someone to Kill the Doves: A Life of Sheila Watson

Like Sheila Watson’s seminal – and quintessentially British Columbian – novel, The Double Hook, F.T. Flahiff’s book takes both its title and its epigraph from a particularly dramatic and thematically relevant moment in its text....

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Review

Corresponding Influence: Selected Letters of Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth

This wonderful collection of letters describes a special friend ship between Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth between 1940 and 1945. Carr was already recognized as a distinguished artist, but she had just begun to write...

Review by Sandra Djwa


Review

Cascadia: The Elusive Utopia – Exploring the Spirit of the Pacific Northwest

Fourteen individually authored chapters (and several supplements) reflect on a shared and bifurcated bioregion and, in the process, assemble the varied ways in which the designation “Cascadia” has been applied. Among the surprises in the...

Review by Laurie Ricou


Review

Kosaburo Shimizu: The Early Diaries, 1909-1926

Many ISSEI , first-generat ion Japanese immigrants, kept diaries – but rarely in English. Now, thanks to translations by his son-in-law, informed and sensitive introductions by his daughter, and the support of other family members,...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

The British Columbia Atlas of Wellness

Maps and atlases have acquired a mystique in the lore of public health since the publication of Dr. John Snow’s famous cholera map of London in the mid-nineteenth century. Somewhere along the way, a notion...

Review by Neil Hanlon


Review

Capital and Labour in the British Columbia Forest Industry, 1934-1974

A few exceptions aside, the remarkable escalation of books that have investigated British Columbia’s forests and forest economy in recent years have not paid much attention to labour. Yet labour’s role is vital to the evolution...

Review by Roger Hayter


Review

Finding Ft. George

One challenge of writing a poetry collection that centres around rural life is that the poet is automatically engaged with debates between centre and periphery, between the urban and the rural, and, in the case...

Review by Mark Diotte


Review

Images from the Likeness House

At the start of Images from the Likeness House, Dan Savard tells us why the photographs he presents of Aboriginal people are important. Put succinctly, it is because of their past and continuing influence on...

Review by Jennifer Cador


Review

Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools, A Memoir.

Canadians who advise survivors of Native residential schools to “ just get over it” should read Broken Circle: The Dark Legacy of Indian Residential Schools. Author Theodore Fontaine, cousin of the more famous Phil, attended...

Review by Jim Miller


Review

Still Fishin’: The BC Fishing Industry Revisited

Is there a future for sustainable commercial fisheries that support independent fishers and their way of life in British Columbia’s coastal communities? This timely question has recently been examined by Alan Haig-Brown – former fisher,...

Review by Diana Pedersen


Review

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Woodsworth

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism is one of those unique edited volumes in which the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts. As suggested in the subtitle, the legacy of J.S. Woodsworth...

Review by Karen Murray


Review

From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada’s Siberian Expedition, 1917-1919

  While the sixtieth anniversary of the Korean War unfolds with little or no fanfare, it is appropriate to consider an even more forgotten Canadian military adventure: the Canadian Siberian Expedition to the Russian port...

Review by Chris Leach