We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (189)

Book Review

Creating Space: My Life and Work in Indigenous Education

There is no such thing as Indigenous education. There is only cross-cultural education containing negotiations between both Indigenous people and the settler societies that colonized them. Understanding the past is essential, but even if we...

Review by Michael Marker


Book Review

Inventing Stanley Park: An Environmental History

Vancouver’s famous park has received a lot of attention, including from notable historians like Jean Barman and Robert A. J. McDonald, prominent artists like Emily Carr, and a continuous collection of journalists and tourism writers...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

The Oil Man and the Sea: Navigating the Northern Gateway

This book, aptly titled The Oil Man and the Sea, is about the current threat posed by the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline to the ecosystems and people of the Great Bear Rainforest. This region,...

Review by Maggie Low


Book Review

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas

  In British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas, Derek Hayes uses over 900 contemporary maps to illustrate the history of British Columbia. The maps are beautifully reproduced, carefully analyzed in captions, often supported by useful...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Vladimir Krajina: World War II Hero and Ecology Pioneer

This book is a major addition to our understanding of Vladimir Krajina’s life and times because it provides a clear context to the life of this remarkable citizen. Jan Drabek’s father and Krajina played different...

Review by Iain Taylor


Book Review

British Columbia’s Inland Rainforest: Ecology, Conservation, and Management

“These two streams at the foot of the hills have formed a wide alluvial, on which are forest trees of enormous size; the white cedars were from fifteen to thirty six feet girth, clean grown...

Review by Andy MacKinnon


Book Review

Creative Subversions: Whiteness, Indigeneity, and the National Imaginary

In Creative Subversions, Margot Francis starts from the premise that some of the key images that inform Canadian national identity, such as the beaver, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), national parks, and Indians are “public...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877-1927

The negotiation and signing of the numbered treaties with First Nations groups in Western Canada, followed shortly thereafter by the opening of the territory to Euro-Canadian settlement, served to consolidate the country’s sovereignty over the...

Review by Heather Devine


Book Review

Our Friend Joe: The Joe Fortes Story

As one Daily Province journalist put it in 1916, “to write an article about English Bay without referring to Joe Fortes, would be like Hamlet without the Prince” (118). For nearly forty years the legendary...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper

Contributing to the emerging and vibrant field of national park histories in Canada, J. Keri Cronin’s Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography, Ecology, and the Wilderness Industry of Jasper explores how photographs created for tourist consumption...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

All Roads Lead to Wells: Stories of the Hippie Days

The growing literature about hippies demonstrates that the phenomenon was anything but uniform. Joy Inglis, in a privately printed book, describes one manifestation: a commune on Quadra Island that was established in 1968 by Antioch...

Review by David Stouck


Book Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years

James D. Anderson’s British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years is a tribute to the first century of the Provincial Park system in BC. This thoroughly researched and richly illustrated history, sensitive to ongoing...

Review by J. Cronin


Book Review

Peter O’Reilly: The Rise of a Reluctant Immigrant

  Peter O’Reilly, third son of a landed Anglo-Irish family with estates in County Meath (Ireland) and Lancashire (England), immigrated to Vancouver Island early in 1859. He was thirty-two years of age and had served...

Review by Cole Harris


Book Review

The Forgotten Explorer: Samuel Prescott Fay’s 1914 Expedition to the Northern Rockies

  In 1914, Samuel Prescott Fay (1884- 1971), a Harvard graduate from Boston, ventured twelve hundred kilometres through the northern Rockies from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. While the Harvard Travelers Club deferred exploration in the...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

A Thousand Dreams: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and the Fight for Its Future

A Thousand Dreams is a very thorough, if partisan, overview of the events in the Downtown Eastside (DES) over the last twenty years. The partisan aspect is due to the overwhelming voice of Larry Campbell...

Review by Gordon Roe


Book Review

Policing the Fringe: The Curious Life of a Small-Town Mountie

Every province and state seems to have spawned its own popular literature about those who enforce the law and those who run afoul of it. British Columbia is no exception, but most popular histories of...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton