We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (20)

Review

War-Torn Exchanges: The Lives and Letters of Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes

For four turbulent years (June 1915 to May 1919) Nursing Sisters Laura Holland and Mildred Forbes served together in the Canadian Army Medical Corps, taking on new administrative and bedside nursing roles in joint postings...

Review by C.M. Haney


Review

Quest for a Profession: The History of the Vancouver General Hospital School of Nursing

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 23, Autumn 1974

Review by Margaret E. Kerr


Review

Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

During the First World War, 2,845 women enlisted as lieutenant nursing sisters in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) (39), but over the ensuing century their experiences of service have largely gone untold. They comprised...

Review by Sarah Glassford


Review

Healing Histories: Stories from Canada’s Indian Hospitals

Histories of Aboriginal health form a field that has captured significant public interest after Ian Mosby’s recent revelation of experiments performed on Aboriginal children in residential schools and hospitals. Laurie Meijer Drees gives an accessible...

Review by Leah Wiener


Review

Caring and Compassion: A History of the Sisters of St. Ann in Health Care in British Columbia

Today, Mount St. Mary Hospital, an extended care facility in Victoria, is one of the last visible legacies of the Sisters of St. Ann’s contributions to health care in British Columbia. But for more than...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Review

UBC: The First 100 Years

With its heavy glossy paper, large format, and copious illustrations, this looks like a celebratory coffee table book. To classify it as such would be wrong. Drawing on previous histories of the University of British...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Passing Through Missing Pages: The Intriguing Story of Annie Garland Foster

In the early 1990s, author Frances Welwood agreed to research the life of Annie Garland Foster for a Nelson Museum exhibition, “The Women of Nelson, 1880-1950.” An early woman graduate of the University of New...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Review

​Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse

In Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse, Lisa Smith transports the reader to late nineteenth century Pacific Northwest and evocatively offers a history of an extraordinary woman living through extraordinary times. Born in...

Review by Jane Errington


Review

The Fisher Queen: A Deckhand’s Tales of the BC Coast

Promoting an upcoming reading of Don Pepper’s A Life on the Water at the Vancouver Maritime Museum, Harbour Publishing exclaims: “Here, finally, is a book about commercial salmon fishing through the eyes of a commercial...

Review by Molly Clarkson


Review

Rain Before Morning

In the spring of 1913, sisters Leah and Elspeth Jamieson, seventeen and eighteen years old, respectively, travel on the Union Steamship Comox from Vancouver past Halfmoon Bay and Pender Harbour to their parents’ home at...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady: Fighting the Killer Flu

As the title suggests, Dr. Fred and the Spanish Lady is an account of the 1918 influenza pandemic as it swept through Vancouver and ran into preparations made for it by the city’s first full-time...

Review by Mona Kaiser


Review

Indigenous Women, Work, and History 1940-1980

Historian Patrick Wolfe has foregrounded the contradictory condition of Indigenous labour within Euro-American settlement by arguing that mythic narratives of settler diligence coexisted with a heavy reliance on colonized Indigenous labour. As he observes in...

Review by Carol Williams


Review

Landscapes of War and Memory: The Two World Wars in Canadian Literature and the Arts, 1977–2007

In Jack Hodgins’s Broken Ground (1998), memories of the Great War haunt the fictional community of Portuguese Creek on Vancouver Island, but what should be remembered of the horrors of France remains uncertain. The notebook...

Review by Nicholas Bradley


Review

Last Dance in Shediac: Memories of Mum, Molly Lamb Bobak

This is a very peculiar book. Although its subject is an artist, the Vancouver-born painter Molly Lamb Bobak, the first female war artist in Canada, there is little about Bobak’s art. Molly Bobak did much more...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

From Classroom to Battlefield: Victoria High School and the First World War

In his portrait of Victoria High School (VHS), Barry Gough has created a vivid microcosm of the First World War’s impact on Canadians. As one of Canada’s foremost historians, Gough brings a special authenticity to...

Review by James Wood


Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood