We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (540)

Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Nationalism from the Margins: Italians in Alberta and British Columbia

According to Patricia Wood, ethnic studies in Canada – or at least the study of Italian immigrants and their descendants – is at best a marginal or fringe activity in the Canadian academy. She complains,...

Review by Gabriele Scardellato


Review

The Amazing Foot Race of 1921: Halifax to Vancouver in 134 Days

Three teams left Halifax in a 3,645-mile pedestrian race to Vancouver in 1921. Amateur sportsman Charles Burkman was first to head west on 17 January, followed a few days later by Jack and Clifford Behan,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Review

Raven Travelling: Two Centuries of Haida Art

A book of this kind – large and sumptuous, rich with colour photo graphs of historical and more recent Haida art from the Northwest Coast, and featuring a dozen essays by Haida and non-Native contributors...

Review by Karen Duffek


Review

The Queen of the North Disaster, The Captain’s Story

As one might expect from a competent and conscientious career mariner, Colin Henthorne’s account of the sinking of the Queen of the North on March 22, 2006, a little south of Prince Rupert on British...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

Vancouver Noir: 1930-1960

In the August 1946 issue of the French cinema studies journal, L’écran française, French critic Nino Frank used the term “film noir” to describe a new generation of American crime films only recently allowed into...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Review

Rewriting Marpole: The Path to Cultural Complexity in the Gulf of Georgia Region

         Rewriting Marpole is the published version of Clark’s PhD dissertation (Clark, 2010) and an outgrowth of his MA thesis (Clark, 2000). The goal of his research “is to determine the spatial...

Review by Jesse Morin


Review

Northwest Coast: Archaeology as Deep History

The Society for American Archaeology website describes their “Contemporary Perspectives” series, in which Northwest Coast is the second title, as “short volumes focused on the archaeology of a specific region.” Aimed at “busy professionals and...

Review by Alan McMillan


Review

Practical Dreamers: Communitarianism and Co-operatives on Malcolm Island

The Finnish socialist utopian community on Malcolm Island has fared better than most smaller BC com munities in the number of books, articles, theses, and films devoted to the telling of its history. Still, the...

Review by David Breen


Review

Asian Religions in British Columbia

The cityscapes of British Columbia have changed dramatically over the last two or three decades. Alongside the high-rise towers and sports stadiums have risen new religious buildings. Very few of these are churches. The new...

Review by Diana Lary


Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The first edition of Go Do Some Great Thing was indeed a “first” in 1978. No book-length survey of the subject then existed, and Kilian’s volume was welcomed as an opportunity for British Columbians to...

Review by Crawford Kilian


Review

Women on Ice: The Early Years of Women’s Hockey in Western Canada

In January 1997 the Gateway, the University of Alberta’s student newspaper, reported on the first game played by the Pandas, the women’s hockey team: “it was fascinating to watch these women playing their hearts out,...

Review by David Mills


Review

The Labyrinth of North American Identities

Much writing on early Canada has sought to explain why Canada is not the United States. The roots of the two countries are alleged to have been very different, and to explain different contemporary societies....

Review by Cole Harris


Review

The Secular Northwest: Religion and Irreligion in Everyday Postwar Life

Scholarly endeavours, at their best, are richly textured conversations with a wide range of considered opinion and new sources that reveal dimensions of a subject previously hidden. Tina Block conducts such an endeavor focusing on...

Review by Brian Fraser


Review

Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017

Cole Harris’s Ranch in the Slocan: A Biography of a Kootenay Farm, 1896 – 2017 is delightful summer reading. It is, primarily, a history of the Harris family’s Bosun Ranch and a record of the lives of...

Review by Shirley McDonald


Review

Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

James Cook was the greatest navigator of his, and perhaps any, age. He did more than any other individual to make the Pacific, which covers one third of the earth’s surface, known to Europe. Through...

Review by Robin Fisher


Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Contours of a People: Metis Family, Mobility, and History

Self-conscious litanies of intellectual genealogy are common in volumes such as this. Although Nicole St-Onge, Carolyn Podruchny, and Brenda Macdougall have their own courses to chart, they are quick to acknowledge their debt to Jennifer...

Review by Scott P. Stephen