We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (293)

Book Review

Kwädąy Dän Ts’inchį: Teachings from Long Ago Person Found

Sometime between 1720 and 1850, late in summer, an eighteen-year-old man was traveling in an icefield in the present-day territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, in what is now Northwestern British Columbia. Well...

Review by Jacob Salmen-Hartley


Book Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Book Review

Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage

“You can get anywhere if you have the time” (106). Kylik Kisoun, an Inuvialuit guide from Inuvik, said this to Brian Castner when Castner, with the help of four friends, canoed the length of the...

Review by Stan Tag


Book Review

Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Over the past few decades, in settler states like Australia and Canada we have seen increased recognition of the complex nature of relations between Indigenous peoples and nations, on one side, and settler groups and...

Review by Brian Egan


Book Review

Surveying the Great Divide: The Alberta/BC Boundary Survey, 1913-1917

Released in 2017 to coincide with national ‘Canada 150’ celebrations, Jay Sherwood’s Surveying the Great Divide also affords an opportunity to reflect on a period of productive inter-provincial cooperation a century ago, at a moment...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Book Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Book Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Book Review

The Regulation of Peace River: A Case Study for River Management

The Peace River is an impressive natural system, flowing from the Rocky Mountains of northeastern British Columbia to the Arctic Ocean, and it has been historically (and prehistorically) a vital part of the region. From...

Review by Undiné Thompson


Book Review

Everything Shuswap

In 1969, Jim Cooperman arrived in British Columbia from the United States, one of many Vietnam ‘war resisters’ who remade our province in ways that few people yet fully appreciate.  One was in building a...

Review by Michael M’Gonigle


Book Review

Crossing Home Ground: A Grassland Odyssey through Southern Interior British Columbia

David Pitt-Brooke is an advocate for the protection and preservation one of British Columbia’s underappreciated landscapes. Rather than looking towards the more iconic mountain peaks and old-growth forests of British Columbia in his search for...

Review by Lauren Harding


Book Review

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada

Animal Metropolis: Histories of Human-Animal Relations in Urban Canada edited by Joanna Dean, Darcy Ingram, and Christabelle Sethna represents a collective effort to create a historiography of nonhuman animals and human subjects in Canada since...

Review by Stephanie Eccles


Book Review

Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time

How do you turn a relatively modest copper mining play on Lake Temagami in the 1950s into Canada’s largest diversified mining company, with a market capitalization in 2017 of nearly $14 billion? In telling the...

Review by Arn Keeling


Book Review

Arctic Ambitions: Captain Cook and the Northwest Passage

James Cook was the greatest navigator of his, and perhaps any, age. He did more than any other individual to make the Pacific, which covers one third of the earth’s surface, known to Europe. Through...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780-1882

Let us get the quibbling out of the way first, lest it leave a bad taste in our mouths at the end. Cambridge University Press appears to have put little effort into indexing this volume,...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


Book Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Toshiko

I haven’t read a comic book since childhood, save for the Classics Comic version of “Romeo and Juliet,” which seemed a short-cut to studying that play in high school. Co-incidentally, Kluckner’s book, more properly described...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Resource Communities in a Globalizing Region: Development, Agency, and Contestation in Northern British Columbia

From the Northern Gateway Pipeline Inquiry, to the Tsilhqot’in land claim decision, to the proposed Site C dam, northern British Columbia has made regular front page news appearances in recent years. In Resource Communities in...

Review by Hereward Longley


Book Review

The Royal Fjord: Memories of Jervis Inlet

In The Royal Fjord, Ray Phillips, a long-time resident of the Sunshine Coast, finishes a job his late father started. It is, says Phillips, a book of “many anecdotes [and other stories that] tell some...

Review by Howard Stewart