We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (629)

Book Review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

Review by Judith Berman


Book Review

The Life and Art of Mildred Valley Thorton

Sheryl Salloum’s new book The Life and Art of Mildred Valley Thornton explores why this important BC artist has generally been ignored in the historical record and cultural landscape of this province. Given that she...

Review by Erin Ramlo


Book Review

Taking My Life

In 2008, when researching Canadian women authors, Linda Morra discovered an unpublished autobiography written by Jane Rule in the 1980s, just before her retirement from writing, in which she recounts with frankness and humour her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Book Review

Lillian Alling: The Journey Home

In 1929, Lillian Alling reached the coast of Alaska on her way to Siberia. Her three-year walk across North America began in New York City and ended at Cape Wales where her footsteps disappeared after...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

The Good Hope Cannery: Life and Death at a Salmon Cannery

Until post-war technology allowed for the centralization of salmon canning, the industry relied on numerous canneries located close to the fishing grounds. More than 200 canneries were scattered along the BC coast, and apart from...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Long Beach Wild: A Celebration of People and Place on Canada’s Rugged Western Shore

Long Beach Wild is the kind of book that academics are often quick to dismiss. It’s popular history, after all (academics, of course, preferring unpopular histories), by a freelance writer whose many previous works include...

Review by Philip Van Huizen


Book Review

Nature’s Northwest: The North Pacific Slope in the Twentieth Century

In Nature’s Northwest, William G. Robbins and Katrine Barber have synthesized a wealth of scholarship on the Greater Northwest, encompassing Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana, and southern British Columbia. The authors track social, economic, political,...

Review by Richard Rajala


Book Review

Caring and Compassion: A History of the Sisters of St. Ann in Health Care in British Columbia

Today, Mount St. Mary Hospital, an extended care facility in Victoria, is one of the last visible legacies of the Sisters of St. Ann’s contributions to health care in British Columbia. But for more than...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West

  Nayan Shah observes that historians get it wrong when they privilege permanent populations over transient, the nuclear family over other domestic arrangements, and polarized rather than various gender roles. He complains – fairly —...

Review by Hugh Johnston


Book Review

V6A: Writing from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

V6A is a postal code prefix in Vancouver. It is, thus, an artificial geographical space defined by a bureaucracy housed far from V6A itself. It runs from Burrard Inlet south to False Creek and Great...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

The Opening Act: Canadian Theatre History 1945-1953

The writing of Canadian Theatre History, as an academic field of study, is a latecomer, with the first wave of academic articles and books appearing only in the mid-1970s along with the founding the Association...

Review by James Hoffman


Book Review

The Encyclopedia of Commercial Drive to 1999

Cafes, pasta and pizza restaurants, very affordable produce markets, carnivalesque community events, and grassroots political demonstrations: all of these are the kaleidoscope one envisions when picturing the East side Vancouver neighbourhood of Grandview. The retail...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Book Review

Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians

Francis Hern’s Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians is the biography of a prominent merchant in Vancouver’s Chinatown in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The story begins with Yip Sang’s arrival in...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland During the First World War

When it comes to the history of women in wartime Canada, the Second World War has so far attracted the most attention from scholars. Perhaps surprisingly, given the otherwise-abundant scholarship on Canada’s Great War, those...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

Mulligan’s Stew: My Life … So Far

Searching the Canadian literary pantry for a satisfying meal of rock and roll history can turn up very slim pickings indeed. Which is why British Columbia veteran DJ, VJ, and actor Terry David Mulligan’s memoir...

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Book Review

Front Lines: Portraits of Caregivers in Northern British Columbia

“I always seem to get inspiration and renewed vitality by contact with this great novel land of yours….”[1] So said Prime Minister Winston Churchill to Vice President Richard Nixon, in June 1954, at a British...

Review by Pamela Ratner


Book Review

All Roads Lead to Wells: Stories of the Hippie Days

The growing literature about hippies demonstrates that the phenomenon was anything but uniform. Joy Inglis, in a privately printed book, describes one manifestation: a commune on Quadra Island that was established in 1968 by Antioch...

Review by David Stouck


Book Review

Raincoast Chronicles 21: West Coast Wrecks and Other Maritime Tales

Tales of shipwrecks along British Columbia’s coast have focused on adventure and tragedy since the fur trade era. With marine transportation occupying such an important role in our daily lives, it is remarkable that so...

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

Feeding the Family: 100 Years of Food and Drink in Victoria

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Book Review

Pioneers of the Pacific Coast: A Chronicle of Sea Rovers and Fur Hunters

Until the later decades of the past century, historical writing was by men, about men, and for men. Narratives of the past made room for a queen, and the odd Laura Secord or Florence Nightingale,...

Review by Chad Reimer


Book Review

Whoever Gives us Bread: The Story of Italians in British Columbia

More than twenty years ago, Gabriele Scardellato lamented the dearth of attention to Italian Canadians living “beyond the frozen wastes” (Scardellato 1989). There have been modest advances since that time, including Patricia K. Wood’s Nationalism...

Review by Stephen Fielding