We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (354)

Book Review

The Slocan History Series

          Edited by Cole Harris, the Slocan History Series began with four booklets that focus primarily on the mining “boom days” of the 1890s and their long-term effects on the region....

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

Since the sixteenth century, intrepid French Canadians have traversed the North American landscape to the very edges of the continent, and established families and communities in virtually every region north of Mexico. Given this legacy...

Review by Heather Devine


Book Review

Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America

Nancy Turner’s new work Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge is undoubtedly her magnum opus. It is a thing of great scope, beauty, eloquence, and cohesion. Yet perhaps its greatest attribute, like all of Turner’s work, is...

Review by Natasha Lyons


Book Review

The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975

This book is splendid work of popular political history, biography, and related media study that co-authors Geoff Meggs (a former communications director to Premier Glen Clark) and Rod Mickleburgh (a veteran of the west coast...

Review by Allen Seager


Book Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Gateway to Promise: Canada’s First Japanese Community

  The authors, Ann-Lee Switzer and Gordon Switzer are both historians and writers with an interest in the Japanese Canadian experience. Gateway to Promise: Canada’s First Japanese Community is a rich history of the Japanese...

Review by Masako Fukawa, Stanley Fukawa


Book Review

Sidetracked: The Struggle for BC’s Fossils

This book explores the relationship between professional paleontologists and amateur fossil collectors in the context of several important paleontological sites in British Columbia. It focuses on the friction that can develop between enthusiastic amateur collectors...

Review by Godfrey Nowlan


Book Review

The Amazing Foot Race of 1921: Halifax to Vancouver in 134 Days

Three teams left Halifax in a 3,645-mile pedestrian race to Vancouver in 1921. Amateur sportsman Charles Burkman was first to head west on 17 January, followed a few days later by Jack and Clifford Behan,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Book Review

Escape to Gold Mountain: A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America

Graphic texts are becoming increasingly popular as a way of telling history. Within three months of its official launch, David Wong’s Escape from Gold Mountain: A Graphic History of the Chinese in North America made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Book Review

Canadians and the Natural Environment to the Twenty-First Century

The field of Canadian environmental history has blossomed over the past two decades. Consequently, instructors of Canadian environmental history courses are becoming increasingly spoiled with good options to choose from for course readers. In all...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

Review by Judith Berman


Book Review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

Review by Margaret (Maggie) Low


Book Review

Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page

“ Who am I,” asks the narrator in an early poem, “Arras,” by P.K. Page, “or, who am I become…?”  (144). It’s a question Page was to return to many times, in both her literary...

Review by Barbara Peace


Book Review

The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The Dunsmuir Years: 1884-1905

Originally, Robert Dunsmuir, the founder of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N), had intended the southern terminus to be Esquimalt and the northern terminus to be Nanaimo, as the name suggests, but before he had...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Book Review

An Environmental History of Canada

On the growing list of books on Canadian environmental history, University of Toronto historian Laurel MacDowell’s new textbook An Environmental History of Canada should take a prominent place. The evolution of this field of study...

Review by Sterling Evans


Book Review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

Review by Carolyn Butler Palmer


Book Review

Salmonbellies vs. The World: The Story of the Most Famous Team in Lacrosse & Their Greatest Rivals

In this well-researched, beautifully illustrated book W.B. MacDonald tells the story of the Salmonbellies from their founding to the present, and he does much more. He traces the evolution of lacrosse in the province, beginning...

Review by Eric Sager


Book Review

Buckerfield: The Story of a Vancouver Family

Buckerfield tells the story of one of Vancouver’s most important business families. The story is structured around two narrative strands. One is the business history of the family patriarch, Edward Ernest Buckerfield, the New Brunswick-born...

Review by Robert A.J. McDonald