We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (360)

Book Review

Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

THE HISTORIOGRAPHIC trends in the scholarly literature pertaining to First Nations material and visual culture have leaned primarily towards stylistic analysis, connoisseurship, and tracing the rise, decline, and “renaissance” of this production. Ronald Hawker’s book,...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Book Review

Too Small to See, Too Big to Ignore: Child Health and Well-being

AS THE MOST RECENT Statistics Canada reports tell us, poverty continues to stalk British Columbia’s youngest citizens. Their distress, with outcomes measured pitilessly in shortfalls in nutrition, education, and health, is directly associated with the...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Book Review

Coasts Under Stress: Restructuring and Social-Ecological Health

Resilience. This is a word that, for me, conjures up a feeling of hard times met with bald-faced determination to get through whatever comes one’s way. Coasts under Stress brings this idea to life through...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Book Review

The Queen of the North Disaster, The Captain’s Story

As one might expect from a competent and conscientious career mariner, Colin Henthorne’s account of the sinking of the Queen of the North on March 22, 2006, a little south of Prince Rupert on British...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Points of Entry: How Canada’s Immigration Officers Decide Who Gets In

Though less controversial than in many other countries, admission of immigrants and refugees to Canada not infrequently raises protests of “too many” or “too few” from partisan commentators, and sensationalised media accounts of particular entry...

Review by David Ley


Book Review

Growing Up Weird: A Memoir of an Oak Bay Childhood

In Growing Up Weird: A Memoir of an Oak Bay Childhood, author Liz Maxwell Forbes provides a very personal account of childhood in a British Columbia community in the 1940s and 1950s. Drawing from her...

Review by Caroline Duncan


Book Review

Britannia’s Navy, On the West Coast of North America 1812 – 1914

This handsome volume, published in hardback with a blue and white dust-cover (featuring E. P. Bedwell’s 1862 painting of the steam-sloop HMS Plumper on the front and a photograph of HMCS Rainbow in Esquimalt, January...

Review by Alexander Howlett


Book Review

People of the Saltwater: An Ethnography of the Gitlax m’oon.

 “Gitlax m’oon, people of the saltwater” are more commonly known as the Gitxaala; their principal village, Lach Klan is located on what is now called Dolphin Island, a little to the south of Prince Rupert....

Review by Robert M. Galois


Book Review

Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time

How do you turn a relatively modest copper mining play on Lake Temagami in the 1950s into Canada’s largest diversified mining company, with a market capitalization in 2017 of nearly $14 billion? In telling the...

Review by Arn Keeling


Book Review

The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam

Anything written about the Site C dam in the past year or two was bound to become dated rapidly, given the pace of events, the uncertainty around the future of the project after the 2017...

Review by Matthew Evenden


Book Review

Borderline Crime: Fugitive Criminals and the Challenge of the Border

Bradley Miller, an assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia, has produced an unprecedented look at the patchwork development of the law as it pertains to the Canada-U.S. border over the course...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Book Review

The Language of Family: Stories of Bonds and Belonging

“What does a book about family look like when everyone’s idea of family is different?” So opens Michelle van der Merwe’s thoughtfully edited volume The Language of Family: Stories of Bond and Belongings. This anthology...

Review by Emily Jean Leischner


Book Review

Christy Clark: Behind the Smile

According to Judi Tyabji this is “not an authorized biography. In fact, it’s not really a biography at all because she’s still premier.” Rather, it is “a book about Premier Clark written by someone who...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Solitudes of the Workplace: Women in Universities

The essays in Solitudes of the Workplace examine the university as a workplace. The authors use the concept of solitude to examine women’s various experiences as workers in universities. A key premise of the book...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Book Review

Coming Home in Gold Brocade: Chinese in Early Northwest America

In Coming Home in Gold Brocade, Bennet Benson and Chuimei Ho, an anthropologist and an archaeologist/historian respectively, present results of their ambitious study of the Chinese in Northwest America — an area including Washington, Oregon,...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Book Review

Cleaner Greener Smarter: A Prescription for Stronger Canadian Environmental Laws and Policies

The World Health Organization released an update to the Global Urban Ambient Air Pollution Database on 12 May 2016, finding that more than 80 percent of people who live in major cities around the world...

Review by Deborah Curran


Book Review

Great Fortune Dream: The Struggles and Triumphs of Chinese Settlers in Canada, 1858-1966

David Chuenyan Lai and Ding Guo’s Great Fortune Dream is a comprehensive history of the Chinese in Canada, from early settlement to the 1960s. While much has been written on the subject, there have been...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

Human Rights in Canada: A History

Human Rights in Canada: A History is a comprehensive survey of the checkered human rights pattern in this country. Dominique Clément writes of a country that in its infancy and youth had a minimal respect...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Vistas: Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway

Vistas, Artists on the Canadian Pacific Railway is about the ways in which painters and photographs met the challenge of capturing the mountain landscape west of Calgary during the late nineteenth century. This book is...

Review by Maria Tippett