We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (43)

Book Review

The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture (2nd Edition)

Twenty years after its initial publication, The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture remains a relevant read. Featuring a new preface and afterword, this second edition of Daniel Francis’s important popular...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Book Review

The Kelowna Story: An Okanagan History

Sharron Simpson’s The Kelowna Story offers her clear intention of providing for the people of Kelowna, most of whom are recent arrivals, “a collective memory” (9) about the origin and development of their community. Overall,...

Review by David Dendy


Book Review

Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th-Century Pacific Rim Cities

    Colonists seldom embarked alone to new continents, and so the act of “settling” was often the act of creating a “settlement.” Penelope Edmonds’s Urbanizing Frontiers reminds us that the interface between settler and...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

Historical Dictionary of the Discovery and Exploration of the Northwest Coast of America

The fourth in a series of historical dictionaries from the Scarecrow Press, Robin Inglis’s Historical Dictionary meets the standard set by its predecessors. In a good, general introduction (there are no citations or notes), Inglis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Book Review

Asian Religions in British Columbia

The cityscapes of British Columbia have changed dramatically over the last two or three decades. Alongside the high-rise towers and sports stadiums have risen new religious buildings. Very few of these are churches. The new...

Review by Diana Lary


Book Review

The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada to 1915

This sophisticated and engaging book has much to offer a number of scholarly areas, including Canadian history, gender studies, and political and legal studies. Working from a massive bedrock of diverse primary materials, Sarah Carter...

Review by Katie Pickles


Book Review

Good Intentions Gone Awry: Emma Crosby and the Methodist Mission on the Northwest Coast

Over the years, historians have paid only sporadic attention to Christian missionaries in British Columbia. While excellent studies periodically appear, they tend to reflect themes and approaches developed elsewhere. Good Intentions Gone Awry thus reflects...

Review by John Barker


Book Review

Leaving Paradise: Indigenous Hawaiians in the Pacific Northwest, 1787-1898

In this book, Jean Barman and Bruce Watson tell a remarkable and little-known story – that of the many hundreds of Hawaiian Islanders who, for more than a century, came to work in the Pacific...

Review by Jennifer Brown


Book Review

Authentic Indians: Episodes of Encounter from the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast

Authentic Indians examines the pressure exerted on a minority to conform to an ideal that the majority defined by another ideal – in short, two abstractions played off one another. Paige Raibmon calls this a...

Review by Brian Dippie


Book Review

Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest

PHOTOGRAPHS OCCUPY a paradoxical place in our historical imagination. As Carol J. Williams notes in the introduction to Framing the West: Race, Gender, and the Photographic Frontier in the Pacific Northwest, contemporary historians have primarily...

Review by Kim Greenwell


Book Review

The Old Red Shirt: Pioneer Poets of British Columbia

THE TITLE OF The Old Red Shirt comes from one of the poems that Yvonne Mearns Klan collects in this wonderful book. The poem in question is by Rebecca Gibbs, a black woman who had established...

Review by W.H. New


Book Review

Beaten Down: A History of Interpersonal Violence in the West

DAVID PETERSON DEL MAR’S work on violence against wives is well known to social and legal historians, and in this important, innovative, and provocative new book, he has broadened his approach to examine interpersonal violence...

Review by Jim Phillips


Book Review

Women and the White Man’s God: Gender and Race in the Canadian Mission Field

THOUGH THE ENCOUNTER between missionaries and Aboriginals continues to fascinate, the tables have dramatically turned. Where once missionaries saw it as part of their task to explain Aboriginal culture to a White society, in today’s...

Review by Margaret Die


Book Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Book Review

With Good Intentions: Euro-Canadian and Aboriginal Relations in Colonial Canada

We might as well name the elephant in the room. The editors did. The book’s first sentence, back cover, and promotional material all imply a fear that it will be received as “an apologist text”...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Book Review

Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History

A primary goal of feminist scholarship and activism is to interrupt assumed notions about gender and to intervene in the naturalization of processes that perpetuate women’s op pression and subordination in patri archal societies. Contemporary...

Review by Patricia Barkaskas


Book Review

Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canada’s Colonial Past

This is a great time to be writing Aboriginal history. A decade of productive interplay between postcolonial studies, feminist analysis, and new methods of research has opened new interpretive pathways to historians of First Nations....

Review by Mary-Ellen Kelm


Book Review

Book Review

The Letters of Margaret Butcher: Missionary-Imperialism on the North Pacific Coast

As a study of missionary imperialism, Mary-Ellen Kelm’s edition of the letters Margaret Butcher wrote from Kitamaat between 1916 and 1919 makes an important contribution to historical conversations about the Haisla, missionaries, and residential schools...

Review by Jacqueline Gresko