We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (249)

Review

Contesting Clio’s Craft: New Directions and Debates in Canadian History

Viewing the historical study of Canada over the past few decades as having put class, gender, ethnic, regional, and cultural conceptions at the heart of Canadian inquiry, contributors to this volume turn to what remains...

Review by Allan Smith


Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Review

Resurrecting Dr. Moss: The Life and Letters of a Royal Navy Surgeon, Edward Lawton Moss MD, RN, 1843-1880

Biographies of historical figures of the second rank often supply the foundational material and needed contextual support upon which larger studies are based. That certainly promises to be the case with this highly engaging and...

Review by Cary Collins


Review

All that We Say Is Ours: Guiyaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation

Guujaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation: All That We Say Is Ours is a human interest story around issues of Aboriginal title and rights. Ian Gill is an award-winning journalist, author, and the...

Review by E.R. Atleo


Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Review

Red Light Neon: A History of Vancouver’s Sex Trade

Prostitution is a complex and politically charged issue that defies simple analysis. Daniel Francis’s new book documents attempts to regulate the sex industry in Vancouver, a city where the subject has occupied a central place...

Review by Dara Culhane


Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Review

The Reluctant Land: Society, Space, and Environment in Canada before Confederation

This ambitious book takes up the daunting challenge of surveying Canada’s evolution from the 1500s to the 1870s. Cole Harris’ long and distinguished career as a historical geographer with exceptionally wide-ranging interests provide him with...

Review by Allan Greer


Review

Captain Alex MacLean: Jack London’s Sea Wolf

Anyone who has delved into the gripping, sometimes impregnable, but always complex world of pelagic fur sealing on the north Pacific Coast knows just what a challenge the history of that subject poses. Then, to...

Review by Cary Collins


Review

Colonial Proximities: Crossracial Encounters and Juridical Truths in British Columbia, 1871-1921

Colonial Proximities is a good book about an important subject: how colonial authorities, anxious about racial difference, tried to use legal and other strategies to regulate and restrict interracial “encounters” during the half-century after confederation...

Review by Hamar Foster


Review

Raymond Collishaw and the Black Flight

Raymond Collishaw (1893-1976), a native of Nanaimo, began his career in uniform as a teenager with the Canadian Fisheries Protection Service. In 1915 Collishaw volunteered for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). He qualified as...

Review by Andrew Iarocci


Review

Behind the Steam: The Inside Story of the Gastown Steam Clock

With a seemingly permanent cluster of tourists snapping its photo, the Gastown steam clock is undoubtedly one of the most popular tourist attractions in Vancouver. Despite its misleading Edwardian appearance (it was built in the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

Review by Carolyn Butler Palmer


Review

Emily Carr: Collected

Two weeks after Emily Carr’s death on 3 March 1945, former Group of Seven artist, Lawren Harris, travelled from his home in Vancouver to Victoria. As the artistic executor of Carr’s estate it fell upon...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Canadian Counterculture and the Environment

Contemporary environmental debate owes a lot to the counterculture movements of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This is one of the main contentions of Canadian Countercultures and the Environment, the fourth book published under the...

Review by James Rhatigan


Review

Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life

David Stouck has written a remarkable history. More than a biography, it is an encompassing account of a remarkable figure in later modern Canadian and international cultural history. Stouck recovers the spirit and material record...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

InJustice Served: The Story of British Columbia’s Italian Enemy Aliens During World War II

Historical redress is a touchy subject and should be handled with care. At root, it is a question about what to address. InJustice Served is funded by the vaguely termed “Community Historical Recognition Program” (CHRP),...

Review by Stephen Fielding


Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Review

The Drive: A Retail, Social and Political History of Commercial Drive, Vancouver, to 1956

On the morning of April 8, 1949, a nattily-dressed crook named Robert Harrison visited the Bank of Commerce at the corner of First Avenue and Commercial Drive and relieved it of $3,000. Armed with a...

Review by Daniel Francis


Review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

Review by James Wood


Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren


Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett