We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (260)

Book Review

British Columbia: Land of Promises

This delightful book is Volume 5 of Oxford University Press’s six-volume Illustrated History of Canada. As the authors note in the introduction, the series is “uniquely Canadian” because the volumes are not shaped by chronology...

Review by Robert Campbell


Book Review

Murder in the Monashees: A Mystery

Russell Montgomery, an office worker from Vancouver, has come to the Monashee Mountains for one week in the hope of shooting a mule deer stag. Through his scope, he fixes a buck, seventy-five yards away....

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Book Review

One River, Two Cultures: A History of the Bella Coola Valley

One River, Two Cultures effectively summarizes the structure and themes of Paula Wild’s study of the Bella Coola Valley. The Bella Coola River dominates the story. Traditional Nuxalkmc (or Nuxalk – Wild uses these terms...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Book Review

The Nature of Gold: An Environmental History of the Klondike Gold Rush

THE NATURE OF GOLD is in several ways a path-breaking work since, although there is a large literature on Yukon environment, there has been very little written on the environmental history of the Territory, and...

Review by William Morrison


Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

McGowan’s War: The Birth of Modern British Columbia on the Fraser River Gold Fields

IN 1858 TENS OF thousands of non-Native goldseekers rushed to the Fraser River in search of gold, a substantial number of them being American citizens who paid little heed to British sovereignty in the region....

Review by Daniel Marshall


Book Review

Building Community in an Instant Town: A Social Geography of Mackenzie and Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia

BRITISH COLUMBIA’S single-industry communities that lie outside the province’s heartland of the Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island have experienced a dreadful pummelling over the last quarter century. Because of technological change, alterations in labour...

Review by Trevor Barnes


Book Review

Building the West: Early Architects of British Columbia

OUR KNOWLEDGE of the history of architecture in British Columbia has taken a quantum leap forward with the publication of Building the West. This remarkable reference work is a collaborative effort involving no fewer than...

Review by Harold Kalman


Book Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

River of Memory: The Everlasting Columbia

River of Memory is a snapshot of the Columbia River prior to the massive human manipulation of the region. Layman argues that, when we understand the river in its natural state prior to 1933, we...

Review by Bruce Shelvey


Book Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

Launching History: The Saga of Burrard Dry Dock

IN 1894, ON THE SHORES of False Creek, Alfred “Andy” Wallace began what would become the largest shipbuilding conglomerate on the West Coast of Canada. Specializing in wooden fishing boats, Wallace soon diversified into wooden...

Review by Andrew Hildred


Book Review

A World Apart: The Crowsnest Communities of Alberta and British Columbia

A WORLD APART, edited by Wayne Norton and Tom Langford, is a solid collection of essays and memoirs about the experience of living and working in the Crowsnest Pass communities of Alberta and British Columbia in the twentieth...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Too Small to See, Too Big to Ignore: Child Health and Well-being

AS THE MOST RECENT Statistics Canada reports tell us, poverty continues to stalk British Columbia’s youngest citizens. Their distress, with outcomes measured pitilessly in shortfalls in nutrition, education, and health, is directly associated with the...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Book Review

Sutebusuton: A Japanese Village on the British Columbia Coast

MITSUO YESAKI was born in Steveston, known to its early Japanese-Canadian residents as Sutebusuton. He spent his early childhood there until the expulsion of Japanese Canadians from the West Coast in 1942. He is a...

Review by Ann Dore


Book Review

American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919-1941

THIS IS AN AMBITIOUS bookthat aims to “recontextualize, if not challenge” (9) several standard historical narratives: of the American West, of Asian American settlement, and of Filipino experiences in the United States in the early...

Review by Geraldine Pratt


Book Review

Company Towns of the Pacific Northwest

COMPANY TOWNS – once ubiquitous across the greater North American West – usually originated in the corporate need for labour in isolated areas of resource extraction. Even those who remember favourably their experiences in company...

Review by William Robbins