We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (373)

Book Review

Creating Indigenous Property: Power, Rights, and Relationships

Is it possible for two entirely different legal frameworks, built by ontologically diverse and frequently disparate parties, to coexist under one judicial system? This question would be difficult enough when considering two parties on equal...

Review by Christopher Martin


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lo-Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley Virtual Museum

Sq’éwlets: A Stó:lō -Coast Salish Community in the Fraser River Valley (Stó:lō Research and Resource Management Centre and Stó:lō Nation, 2016) is a virtual museum in the form of a website that reflects a collaborative...

Review by Dara Kelly


Sto:lo

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

In/consequential Relationships: Refusing Colonial Ethics of Engagement in Yuxweluptun’s Inherent Rights, Vision Rights

On the closing day of the Museum of Anthropology’s Unceded Territories exhibit of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s art, crowds formed queues long enough to snake through the halls and to pack the exhibit space for the...

Review by Sarah King


Yuxweluptun Lawrence Paul

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Konelīne: our land beautiful

As the language and culture director for the Tahltan Nation and a Tahltan academic, I believe giving voice to our people is crucial. Until recent times, the academy has privileged the voices of settlers and...

Review by Matthew Gartner


Book Review

Fishes of the Salish Sea

Having studied fish for more than 40 years, I have accumulated more than 50 “fishes of…” books, latitudinally arranged on my office shelf, and none of them can compare in the quality, quantity, and aesthetics...

Review by Leo Bodensteiner


Book Review

Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese Canadians

In historical memory, the forced confinement and exclusion of 22,000 Japanese Canadians from 1942 to 1949 remains one of the darkest and, unfortunately, least understood chapters in Canadian history. Although the story has been told...

Review by Jonathan van Harmelen


Book Review

Decolonizing Discipline: Children, Corporal Punishment, Christian Theologies, and Reconciliation

Decolonizing Discipline is a direct response to the sixth call of action made by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to repeal Section 43 of Canada’s criminal code, which allows corporal punishment “to correct what is...

Review by Alex Gagne


Book Review

The Object’s the Thing: The Writings of Yorke Edwards, a Pioneer of Heritage Interpretation in Canada

When we visit a nature park or a museum, do we consider how interpretation contributed to our experience? For Yorke Edwards, “the father of nature interpretation in Canada,” interpreting the object is “the thing.” As...

Review by Patricia E. Roy


Book Review

Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet

In Deep and Sheltered Waters: The History of Tod Inlet, David R. Gray – with a Foreword from his long-time friends and colleagues, Nancy J. Turner and Robert D. Turner – sets out to illuminate...

Review by Jacquelyn Miller


Book Review

Big Promises, Small Government: Doing Less with Less in the BC Liberal New Era

George Abbott was a cabinet minister for twelve years in the BC Liberal governments of Gordon Campbell and Christy Clark.  In Big Promises, Small Government, he reflects on his tenure in the first Campbell government...

Review by Stephen Phillips


Book Review

A Bounded Land: Reflections on Settler Colonialism in Canada

Historical geographer Cole Harris, professor emeritus at UBC, has in his latest book brought together a number of his articles, some previously published, to focus on the subject of settler colonialism in Canada. It is...

Review by Kenneth Favrholdt


Book Review

Unmooring The Komagata Maru: Charting Colonial Trajectories

From food (Valenze, 2012) to crops (Ali 2020, Rappaport 2019) to commodities (Curry-Machado, 2013) to digital cultures (Punathambekar and Mohan, 2019) and to empires (Bayly, 2003; Hopkins, 2003) there has been a steady scholarly commitment to...

Review by Dharitri Bhattacharjee


Book Review

Entering Time: The Fungus Man Platters of Charles Edenshaw

In 2013 the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition brought together three argillite platters made in the late 1880s by Da.a. xiigang, Charles Edenshaw – one from the Field Museum in Chicago, one from the...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Spirits of the Coast: Orcas in Science, Art and History

As I write, the world has received news that Talequah (or J35), the Southern Resident killer whale who carried her dead newborn for two weeks in 2018, is pregnant again. Spirits of the Coast: Orcas...

Review by Meghan Walley


Book Review

Postsecondary Education in British Columbia: Public Policy and Structural Development, 1960-2015

As distinct from previous historical accounts of postsecondary education in BC, Cowin makes it clear that he will cover the development of the “entire” postsecondary system in BC (3). For Cowin, this means the whole...

Review by Donald Fisher


Book Review

Towards a New Ethnohistory: Community-Engaged Scholarship Among the People of the River

This book purports to represent a ‘New Ethnohistory’ as community-engaged research in First Nations communities. It consists primarily of essays written by graduate students who participated in the Ethnohistory Field School run since 1997 by...

Review by Alan B. Anderson


Book Review

Iroquois in the West

Sometimes the most detailed and poignant histories emerge from historical fragments. In Iroquois in the West Jean Barman uses what she calls “slivers of stories from the shadows of the past” to tell a rich...

Review by Dane Allard


Book Review

Stagecoach North: A History of Barnard’s Express

In Stagecoach North, Ken Mather undercovers the history of one of the most important companies in British Columbia:  Barnard’s Express. From 1862 to 1914 this famed company carried passengers, freight, and mail along the Cariboo...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

The Co-op Revolution: Vancouver’s Search for Food

When growers, producers and practitioners self-organize around shared interests in the local foods economy, their social and economic actions—whether through a farmer’s market, buying co-op or the production of local food—can feel tenuous on the...

Review by Diandra Oliver


Book Review

Indigenous Repatriation Handbook

The First Peoples of the Pacific Coast are at the forefront of Indigenous Museology and Repatriation Scholarship. While some communities might be just starting to tangle with the complex politics and strategies of claiming back...

Review by Anna De Aguayo


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw