We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (428)

Book Review

When Days Are Long: Nurse in the North

In this book, first published upon her retirement in 1965, Amy Wilson presents a biographical history of her career as a public health nurse in Northern British Columbia and the Yukon during the 1950s and...

Review by Geertje Boschma


Book Review

This Was Our Valley

The 2019 edition of This Was Our Valley by Shirlee Smith Matheson and Earl K. Pollon continues a longstanding conversation about the impacts of large dams in northern British Columbia. This story, told in three acts,...

Review by Douglas Robb


Book Review

Captive Audience: How Corporations Invaded our Schools

Corporate involvement in Canadian schools is an emotional topic. There are alarmists, like some of the teachers’ federations. They long for public education’s halcyon days and warn vaguely of nefarious “neoliberals” set to “privatize.” There...

Review by Jason Ellis


Book Review

Cornelius O’Keefe: the Life, Loves, and Legacy of an Okanagan Rancher

Cornelius O’Keefe was one of a small group of pioneer Okanagan ranchers who managed, in the late nineteenth century, to accumulate land, wealth, and influence. His rags-to-riches story was made possible by a combination of...

Review by Duane Thomson


Book Review

Working Towards Equity: Disability Rights Activism and Employment in Late Twentieth-Century Canada

Working Towards Equity examines the intersection of the contested nature of disability movements and activism and decision maker actions related to labour market activity in late 20thcentury Canada. Galer’s argument is that advances in labour...

Review by Mario Levesque


Book Review

Outside In: A Political Memoir

Outside In can be read and enjoyed as a straightforward memoir of Libby Davies’ remarkable career as an activist and elected official.  It traces her path from her early days working for housing justice in Vancouver’s...

Review by Gord Perks


Book Review

Moved by the State: Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

Focusing on the “trente glorieuses” period, Tina Loo’s study of how the Canadian welfare-state pursued its promise of universality gives us an in-depth look at five communities: namely Inuit villages in the district of Keewatin...

Review by Caroline Desbiens


Book Review

By Law or In Justice

The foundation of Professor Jane Dickson’s book, By Law Or in Justice, is her work as a Commissioner for the Indian Specific Claims Commission, from 2002 to 2009. The Commission itself endured from 1991 to...

Review by David Milward


Book Review

Suffer the Little Children: Genocide, Indigenous Nations and the Canadian State

Tamara Starblanket is a Nehiyaw (Cree) legal scholar from Ahthakakoop First Nation and is currently the Dean of Academics at the Native Education College in Vancouver, which is located on the traditional territories of the...

Review by Carling Beninger


Book Review

On The Line: A History of the British Columbia Labour Movement

On The Line is an account of BC trade unions by the BC Labour Heritage Centre (an offshoot of the BC Federation of Labour) written by retired Vancouver Sun labour reporter Rod Mickleburgh. In a well-illustrated...

Review by Robin Wylie


Book Review

Return of the Wolf: Conflict and Coexistence

In his famous study Of Wolves and Men (1978), Barry Lopez pertinently noted that ‘the wolf exerts a powerful influence on the human imagination. It takes your stare and turns it back on you.’  Paula...

Review by K R Jones


Book Review

A Queer Love Story: The Letters of Jane Rule and Rick Bébout

If this is a queer love story between Jane Rule, the legendary lesbian novelist of Galiano Island, and Rick Bébout, a long-time collective member of The Body Politic in Toronto, it should really be considered a...

Review by Steven Maynard


Book Review

Building a Collaborative Advantage: Network Governance and Homelessness Policy-Making in Canada

With 235,000 people experiencing homelessness each year in Canada, the nature and quality of the state response are crucial to preventing and ultimately ending homelessness. Doberstein’s analysis of the role governance networks –groups of community...

Review by Erin Dej


Book Review

Reconsidering Confederation: Canada’s Founding Debates, 1864-1999

A dynamic collection of essays, Reconsidering Confederationsets out to “provide a primer for Canadians who want to better understand similarities and differences between provinces, regions, and peoples” (13). Much more than a basic outline of...

Review by Alex Gagne


Book Review

Selling Out or Buying In? Debating Consumerism in Vancouver and Victoria, 1945-1985

Today we live in a consumer-oriented culture in which material items help to define who we are, or, who we want to be. To meet our material needs, stores are now open seven days a...

Review by Dr. Matthew J. Bellamy


Book Review

Trail North: The Okanagan Trail of 1858-68 and Its Origins in British Columbia and Washington

In Trail North, Ken Mather directs our attention to a relatively forgotten part of British Columbian history: the trails linking the interior of British Columbia to the Columbia Plateau of Washington and their contribution to...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

The North-West Mounted Police, 1873-1885

In a wonderfully detailed and researched volume, Jack F. Dunn has created a study that is a worthy addition to Brendan and Horall’s Red Coats on the Prairiesand R.C. Macleod’s NWMP and Law Enforcement.  Focusing...

Review by Dr. Soren I. Fanning


Book Review

Mudflat Dreaming: Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought them in 1970s Vancouver

Liminal spaces make places. This is the central theme of Jean Walton’s book, Mudflat Dreaming, an unconventional work of literary nonfiction that weaves together memoir, film studies, and Vancouver history in the 1970s, a pivotal...

Review by Kaden Jelsing


Book Review

Spying on Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the Origins of the Long Cold War

Spying on Canadians opens with the goal of adding “to the political demands for a new commitment for a transparency in national security appropriate to our purportedly democratic society.” (9) It is a principled point. Describing...

Review by Jonathan Swainger