We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (393)

Review

Demon Rum or Easy Money: Government Control of Liquor in British Columbia from Prohibition to Privatization

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 97, Spring 1993  

Review by Stephen Tomblin


Review

Public Power, Private Dams: The Hell’s Canyon High Dam Controversy

This is a book about why something did not happen. It is not quite counter-factual history, but it is an approach that works to remind us that nothing is inevitable. In the postwar Northwest, nothing,...

Review by Tina Loo


Review

The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Volumes 1-6

A portion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) mandate laid out in Schedule N to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement [IRSSA] of 2006 said that the Commission was to “Produce and submit to...

Review by J.R. Miller


Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Review

Polarity, Patriotism and Dissent in Great War Canada, 1914-1919

Premised on his insight that “If there is an arithmetic to the management of dissent, there is also a mathematics” (6), Brock Millman’s study of the polarization of Canadian society into supporters and opponents of...

Review by James Wood


Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Review

British Columbia Politics and Government

British Columbia’s unique geographical location and relative isolation in Canada makes for an interesting study of how politics can be done differently in the federation. The contributors to British Columbia Politics and Government highlight the...

Review by Allan Craigie


Review

Canadian Liberalism and the Politics of Border Control, 1867-1967

Always among the more contentious of Canadian public policies, the control of immigration, legal and illegal, is once again on the front burner. Political scientist Christopher Anderson sets himself the task of explaining the broad...

Review by Reg Whitaker


Review

National Visions, National Blindness: Canadian Art and Identities in the 1920s

Leslie Dawn makes an ambitious contribution to a hotly debated topic of Canadian cultural history – the role of the visual arts in the formation of the image of a modern Canadian nation. The title’s...

Review by Gerta Moray


Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Review

Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia

Patricia E. Roy’s Boundless Optimism: Richard McBride’s British Columbia examines the political career of one of the province’s most significant premiers. Born in New Westminster in 1870 and educated at New Westminster High School and...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

When Good Drugs Go Bad: Opium, Medicine, and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws

This is a story of contested authority. Dan Malleck has drawn from legal, medical, newspaper, policy, and pharmacy perspectives to explore the shifting conceptualizations of opium addiction and regulation in nineteenth century Canada. In some...

Review by Erika Dyck


Review

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas

In British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas, Derek Hayes uses over 900 contemporary maps to illustrate the history of British Columbia. The maps are beautifully reproduced, carefully analyzed in captions, often supported by useful historical...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Native Peoples and Water Rights: Irrigation, Dams, and the Law in Western Canada

Making the jump from studies of static property such as land to the fluid resource of water, Kenichi Matsui’s Native Peoples and Water Rights explores new territory by examining the intersection of Aboriginal rights and...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

A Stain upon the Sea: West Coast Salmon Farming

This collection explores many of the controversial issues surrounding fish farming practices in British Columbia. In five separate essays, the authors illustrate the importance of the precautionary principle in experimenting with new chemicals and processes...

Review by Lissa Wadewitz


Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Evergreen Playland: A Road Trip through British Columbia

Evergreen Playland is the dvd version of the movie of the same name that was part of the exhibition “Free Spirits: Stories of You, Me and BC,” held at the Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM) in...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975

This book is splendid work of popular political history, biography, and related media study that co-authors Geoff Meggs (a former communications director to Premier Glen Clark) and Rod Mickleburgh (a veteran of the west coast...

Review by Allen Seager


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las; Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom follows one woman’s involvement with “colonial interventions” (407) into Kwa’waka’wakw economics, government, and religion in the late nineteenth and early...

Review by Andrew Cienski