We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (158)

Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

The W̲SÁNEĆ and Their Neighbours: Diamond Jenness on the Coast Salish of Vancouver Island, 1935

Anthropologist Rolf Knight launched a new chapter of Indigenous history in 1978 with the publication of his book, Indians at Work: An Informal History of Native Indian Labour in British Columbia, 1858-1930.[1]  In contrast to...

Review by Wendy Wickwire


Review

Tax, Order, and Good Government: A New Political History of Canada, 1867-1917.

E.A Heaman has produced a decided masterpiece on a topic too often thought to be dry as a bone. Taxation, with its underlying legitimacy of consent, is the lifeblood of the state, supplying it with...

Review by Michael J. Prince


Review

One Step Over the Line: Toward a History of Women in the North American Wests

One Step Over the Line is the second published collection of papers drawn from a conference held at the University of Calgary in 2002 (the first, Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History, was...

Review by Chris Clarkson


Review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

Review by Margaret Anderson


Review

Undelievered Letters to Hudson’s Bay Company Men on the Northwest Coast of America, 1830-57

In Undelivered Letters, editors Judith Hudson Beattie and Helen M. Buss provide a voice for those North American fur trade people usually thought to be voiceless. This publication of over 200 undelivered letters to men who...

Review by Carolyn Podruchny


Review

Go Do Some Great Thing: The Black Pioneers of British Columbia

The first edition of Go Do Some Great Thing was indeed a “first” in 1978. No book-length survey of the subject then existed, and Kilian’s volume was welcomed as an opportunity for British Columbians to...

Review by Crawford Kilian


Review

Myra’s Men: Building the Kettle Valley Railway, Myra Canyon to Penticton

In August 2003, the Okanagan Mountain Park fire southeast of Kelowna destroyed or damaged the Myra Canyon trestles, eighteen railroad structures, and the roadbed between them. This 5.5-mile (8.9-km) elevated path around a mountainous amphitheatre...

Review by Frank Leonard


Review

Into the House of Old: A History of Residential Care in British Columbia

Megan Davies’s carefully worked study on residential care for the aged in British Columbia does in deed take us into the “house of old.” And it is a sad journey, made more resonant to many...

Review by Patricia Vertinsky


Review

Front Lines: Portraits of Caregivers in Northern British Columbia

“I always seem to get inspiration and renewed vitality by contact with this great novel land of yours….”[1] So said Prime Minister Winston Churchill to Vice President Richard Nixon, in June 1954, at a British...

Review by Pamela Ratner


Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Review

Militia Myths: Ideas of the Canadian Citizen Soldier, 1896-1921

The Canadian Scottish (Princess Mary’s) regiment recently celebrated its 100th anniversary. Popularly known as the Can Scots, it is the only militia unit on Vancouver Island. The regiment had previously been honoured with the freedom...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Retail Nation: Department Stores and the Making of Modern Canada

Retail Nation is a thought-provoking study of the intersection between a rapidly growing consumer economy and the formation of culture and identity in Canada between 1890 and 1940. During this period, argues Donica Belisle, department...

Review by Nicolas Kenny


Review

A Sisterhood of Suffering and Service: Women and Girls of Canada and Newfoundland During the First World War

When it comes to the history of women in wartime Canada, the Second World War has so far attracted the most attention from scholars. Perhaps surprisingly, given the otherwise-abundant scholarship on Canada’s Great War, those...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Review

Commerce by a Frozen Sea: Native Americans and the European Fur Trade

This may be the most important book on the history of the fur trade in the Hudson’s Bay Company Territories published in a generation. Although its purview does not include British Columbia, all historians of...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Review

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen: A Rookie Reporter in the Cariboo

Never Shoot a Stampede Queen tells the story of a twenty-two-year-old university graduate from Vancouver adapting to life in Williams Lake in the 1980s after he accidentally landed a job there as a community newspaper...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

Mudflat Dreaming: Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought them in 1970s Vancouver

Liminal spaces make places. This is the central theme of Jean Walton’s book, Mudflat Dreaming, an unconventional work of literary nonfiction that weaves together memoir, film studies, and Vancouver history in the 1970s, a pivotal...

Review by Kaden Jelsing


Review

Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns

Shirley D. Stainton’s Children of the Kootenays: Memories of Mining Towns describes her own and her brother Ray’s childhoods in West Kootenay mining communities during the 1930s and 1940s. Stainton’s father, Lee Hall, was a cook...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

This Was Our Valley

The 2019 edition of This Was Our Valley by Shirlee Smith Matheson and Earl K. Pollon continues a longstanding conversation about the impacts of large dams in northern British Columbia. This story, told in three acts,...

Review by Douglas Robb


Review

Bluebacks and Silver Brights: A Lifetime in the BC Fisheries From Bounty to Plunder

For sixty years the Campbell Avenue fish dock on Burrard Inlet was the hub of Vancouver’s fishing industry, home to numerous fish plants, smokehouses, and floats where the boats tied up. The Safarik family business,...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia

I have good reason to be eternally grateful to the author of this book on BC’s freshwater fishes. Many years ago in my first university post, when desperately seeking interesting material with which to enliven the...

Review by Tony Pitcher