We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (252)

Book Review

Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians in the Twentieth Century

This long-awaited book emerged from a May 2000 conference entitled “The Nikkei Experiences in the Pacific Northwest.” The conference was organized by the Department of History at the University of Washington (UW) in conjunction with...

Review by Yuko Shibata


Book Review

Sharks of the Pacific Northwest: Including Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and Alaska

Humans have instigated the generalized obliteration of large predators for centuries. The severe, routinely fatal penalty that sharks have paid appears to result in large part from social perspectives founded in fear and ignorance. From...

Review by Anna Hall


Book Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Book Review

Sakura in the Land of the Maple Leaf: Japanese Cultural Traditions in Canada

This book, edited by the curator of Asian studies at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec, is a worthy publication. It is a compilation of three research projects conducted in 1976-77 for the...

Review by Michiko Ayukawa


Book Review

Nature and Human Societies: Canada and Arctic North America: An Environmental History

In the three decades since environmental history burst onto the academic scene in the United States in the early 1970s, the field experienced impressive growth among American scholars and internationally in arenas such as South...

Review by John Sandlos


Book Review

‘Call Me Hank’: A Sto:lo Man’s Reflections on Logging, Living, and Growing Old

Old loggers love to tell stories, but few find their way onto paper. We are fortunate indeed, then, that in 1969 linguist Wyn Roberts visited Henry Pennier at his home near Mission and asked the...

Review by Richard Rajala


Book Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

Review by Margaret Anderson


Book Review

Wrong Highway: The Misadventures of a Misplaced Society Girl

Wrong Highway is the memoir of Stella Jenkins, a middle-class mother of four from Victoria, who in 1948, recently divorced, formed a relationship with Bob Smith, a trapper and labourer. Stella left Victoria with her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Book Review

Raising the Workers’ Flag: The Workers’ Unity League in Canada, 1930-1936

The struggle to build trade unions in the extractive and manufacturing industries of Canada — mining, forestry, fishing, clothing, furniture, and others — was meteoric and its demise equally rapid. Raising the Workers’ Flag provides...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

Making Headlines: 100 Years of the Vancouver Sun

The Vancouver Sun turned one hundred in 2012. To mark this event, reporter Shelley Fralic compiled a (roughly) chronological account of goings-on in the city and at the paper itself. It is not so much...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Why Canadian Forestry and Mining Towns are Organized Differently: The Role of Staples in Shaping Community, Class, and Consciousness

Canada’s single industry towns (SITs), especially resource towns, continue to be the focus of considerable academic and policy attention. Canada’s population may be highly urbanized, indeed urbane, with the major metropolitan and even medium-sized urban...

Review by Roger Hayter