We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (402)

Book Review

Philip Timm’s Vancouver: 1900-1910

I first met Fred Thirkell in the late 1970s when I ran an antique store in North Vancouver. Fred was a postcard collector, and we played the familiar dance between buyer and seller in the...

Review by Robin Anderson


Book Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Book Review

From New Peoples to New Nations: Aspects of Metis History and Identity from the Eighteenth to the Twenty-first Centuries

Gerhard Ens and Joe Sawchuck’s co-written volume From New Peoples to New Nations approaches historical and contemporary Métis identity from a perspective that is uncommon and even contested among Indigenous histories. From a social constructionist...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Book Review

Equality Deferred: Sex Discrimination and British Columbia’s Human Rights State, 1953-84

In Canada, Dominique Clément tells us, human rights legislation has been mainly associated with discrimination against women. In British Columbia, the women’s movement was deeply invested in human rights discourse and practice, and by the...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order

Street Sex Work and Canadian Cities: Resisting a Dangerous Order aims to give voice to street-based sex workers in urban Canada, in particular Indigenous women who face intersecting stigma associated with sex work, racism, and...

Review by Cecilia Benoit


Book Review

Accidental Eden: Hippie Days on Lasqueti Island

A friend said recently that he didn’t think much of the new generation of histories about British Columbia’s “back-to-the-landers” in the 1960s and seventies. Because if you weren’t there, then the stories just don’t mean...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Surveying Southern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1901-07

When the Vancouver convention centre was completed in 2009, a series of interpretive panels describing the history of British Columbia were placed along the waterfront promenade. Featured among these panels is the story of “BC’s...

Review by Kelly Black


Book Review

Tales from the Back Bumper: A Century of BC Licence Plates

My parents still have a set of white-on-blue licence plates in their garage, kept from the mid-1980s, when British Columbia switched to the blue-on-white plates with waving flag that have now been standard issue for...

Review by Ben Bradley


Book Review

Schooling in Transition: Readings in Canadian History of Education

This collection of essays is edited by Sara Burke, a historian, and Patrick Milewski, a sociologist and former elementary school teacher, at Laurentian University. The title, Schooling in Transition, reflects the editors’ belief that public...

Review by Patrick A. Dunae


Book Review

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 Through Murder, Execution, Assassination and Suicide

Two decades ago, a prominent conservative academic smacked down Canadian university instructors with the provocatively-titled Who Killed Canadian History? J.L. Granatstein’s answer was, in part, social history and the historians who taught it. Social historian...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

Playing for Change: The Continuing Struggle for Sport and Recreation

Rarely does a book cover depict a Canadian athlete with claims to a major role in academic life and advocacy politics, but this is no ordinary cover. The front of Playing for Change depicts young Bruce Kidd,...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

The Peace in Peril: The Real Cost of the Site C Dam

Anything written about the Site C dam in the past year or two was bound to become dated rapidly, given the pace of events, the uncertainty around the future of the project after the 2017...

Review by Matthew Evenden


Book Review

Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time

How do you turn a relatively modest copper mining play on Lake Temagami in the 1950s into Canada’s largest diversified mining company, with a market capitalization in 2017 of nearly $14 billion? In telling the...

Review by Arn Keeling


Book Review

The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts

Kerry Mason begins The Life and Art of Arthur Pitts with a question: ‘Why haven’t I heard about this artist?’ (x) By the end of the book the reader is persuaded that we should indeed...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Resource Communities in a Globalizing Region: Development, Agency, and Contestation in Northern British Columbia

From the Northern Gateway Pipeline Inquiry, to the Tsilhqot’in land claim decision, to the proposed Site C dam, northern British Columbia has made regular front page news appearances in recent years. In Resource Communities in...

Review by Hereward Longley


Book Review

Empowering Electricity: Co-operatives, Sustainability, and Power Sector Reform in Canada

Empowering Electricity is a detailed examination of the political and social economy of electricity co-operatives and power sector reform in Canada. The co-operative movement is commonly, and rightfully, viewed as a model of grassroots organization...

Review by Nichole Dusyk


Book Review

Charles Edenshaw

This is the catalogue for the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition. Curated and edited by Robin K. Wright, Curator of Native American Art and Director of the Bill Holm Center for the Study of...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren