We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (171)

New Media / Exhibition Review

Screen Sovereignty: Indigenous Matriarch 4 Articulating the Future of Indigenous VR

 Indigenous matriarchs are changing the culture of the technology industry through virtual reality (VR). Indigenous Matriarch 4 (IM4) is the first Indigenous virtual reality media lab and is situated on the West Coast. Currently, it...

Review by Courteney Morin


new media technology virtual reality aboriginal art

Review

Vanishing British Columbia

Recently, while speeding along West Broadway on a Number 99 bus, the older gentleman sitting next to me mused that so many buildings have been demolished that young people would soon have no idea of...

Review by Jill Wade


Review

One River, Two Cultures: A History of the Bella Coola Valley

One River, Two Cultures effectively summarizes the structure and themes of Paula Wild’s study of the Bella Coola Valley. The Bella Coola River dominates the story. Traditional Nuxalkmc (or Nuxalk – Wild uses these terms...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Oregon’s Promise: An Interpretive History

WHY SHOULD BC Studies review a history of the State of Oregon, situated in another country and some 300 kilometres to the south? For many reasons. Our province and Oregon lie in a single economic-environmental...

Review by Roderick Barman


Review

The Whaling Indians: Legendary Hunters

THE INTENT OF The Whaling Indians: Legendary Hunters is to present the “Native point of view” and so that will also be the perspective of this book review. On the surface of things, the method...

Review by Umeek Atleo


Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


Review

Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780-1882

Let us get the quibbling out of the way first, lest it leave a bad taste in our mouths at the end. Cambridge University Press appears to have put little effort into indexing this volume,...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

Once They Were Hats: In Search of the Mighty Beaver

In Once They Were Hats, Francis Backhouse, who teaches creative nonfiction at the University of Victoria, invites us to join her in exploring the multifaceted history of the beaver. She recounts personal stories about trips...

Review by Ezekiel Gow


Review

The Salmon People

When The Salmon People was first published in 1967, commercial salmon fishing still sustained many coastal communities, although as Hugh McKervill pointed out then, there were plenty of signs that the resource was threatened. In...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Review

Climber’s Paradise: Making Canada’s Mountain Parks, 1906-1974

Two powerful and iconic institutions can be found at the centre of most histories of tourism and recreation in the mountains of western Canada: the Canadian Pacific Railway and the agency known today as Parks...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Resettling the Range: Animals, Ecologies and Human Communities in British Columbia.

This is a thought-provoking book. Focussing on the rangelands of Interior British Columbia, John Thistle describes how commercial ranching begot inequities, dispossessions, and ecological degradation. All, according to his analysis, were avoidable. Resettling the Range...

Review by Max Foran


Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie


Review

Edmonton House Journals, Correspondence and Reports: 1806-1821

This volume assembles the remaining records (with the exception of accounts) produced between 1806 and 1821 at Edmonton House, the Saskatchewan District headquarters of the Hudson’s Bay Company. This period starts with the 1806 Lewis...

Review by Jamie Morton


Review

The Queen of the North Disaster, The Captain’s Story

As one might expect from a competent and conscientious career mariner, Colin Henthorne’s account of the sinking of the Queen of the North on March 22, 2006, a little south of Prince Rupert on British...

Review by Howard Stewart