We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (455)

Book Review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

Review by Judy Campbell


Book Review

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia

On 23 January 2010 the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia celebrated completion of its ambitious $55.5 million “Partnership of Peoples” renewal project. The expansion included the MOA Centre for Cultural Research,...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

Imagining British Columbia: Land, Memory & Place

Imagining British Columbia: Land, Memory and Place, edited by Daniel Francis, is a collection of twenty creative non-fiction essays contributed by members of the Federation of British Columbia Writers. The federation invited writers to submit...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

Chinese Community Leadership: Case Study of Victoria in Canada

I am particularly interested in this volume, having been born in Vancouver’s Chinatown in 1938 and having a father who was treasurer of a district association. He was a shirt tailor, and I remember in...

Review by Larry Wong


Book Review

Forestry and Biodiversity: Learning How to Sustain Biodiversity in Managed Forests

 “No more clear-cuts!” So announced MacMillan Bloedel CEO Tom Stephens in a dramatic 1998 policy shift. The gap between global social expectations and the firm’s perceived destructive logging practices, primarily the accusation that it over-harvested pristine...

Review by David Brownstein


Book Review

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Woodsworth

Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism is one of those unique edited volumes in which the whole is indeed greater than the sum of its parts. As suggested in the subtitle, the legacy of J.S. Woodsworth...

Review by Karen Murray


Book Review

The Power of Promises: Rethinking Indian Treaties in the Pacific Northwest

This multidisciplinary, transnational volume is a welcome addition to treaty literature in Canada and the United States. Situating treaty-making in the Pacific Northwest within a broader global context of imperialism and colonial indigenous-settler relations, the...

Review by Paulette Regan


Book Review

Militant Minority: British Columbia Workers and the Rise of a New Left, 1948-1972

Labour historians have been arguing about the left in British Columbia politics and labour for ages. Now, through a skilful conversion of his 2008 University of New Brunswick dissertation “Tug of War,” University of Victoria...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Book Review

Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury: a History. Vancouver: The Fifteenth Field Artillery

Victor Stevenson’s longstanding personal and professional attachment to Vancouver’s Bessborough Armoury is reflected in his concise and well-researched account of the building’s history. Having served as both honourary colonel of the 15th Field Artillery Regiment,...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Health and Aging in British Columbia: Vulnerability and Resilience

Health and Aging in British Columbia: Vulnerability and Resilience, edited by Denise Cloutier-Fisher, Leslie T. Foster and David Hultsch, is a collection of 17 chapters on health and aging in British Columbia prepared by 30...

Review by James Thornton


Book Review

Commerce by a Frozen Sea: Native Americans and the European Fur Trade

This may be the most important book on the history of the fur trade in the Hudson’s Bay Company Territories published in a generation. Although its purview does not include British Columbia, all historians of...

Review by Theodore Binnema


Book Review

Mountains So Sublime: Nineteenth-Century British Travellers and the Lure of the Rocky Mountain West

Mountains So Sublime is a thoughtful study of the reactions of Victorian British travellers to the Rocky Mountain West, as expressed through their published travelogues and unpublished diaries and reminiscences. Recently retired from a long...

Review by Forrest Pass


Book Review

Practical Dreamers: Communitarianism and Co-operatives on Malcolm Island

The Finnish socialist utopian community on Malcolm Island has fared better than most smaller BC com munities in the number of books, articles, theses, and films devoted to the telling of its history. Still, the...

Review by David Breen


Book Review

Chinese Servants in the West: Florence Baillie-Grohman’s “The Yellow and White Agony”

W.A. Baillie-Grohman is known to British Columbians for his aborted plan to build a canal in the East Kootenay and his stories of big game hunting, notably Fifteen Years’ Sport and Life in the Hunting...

Review by Patrica Roy


Book Review

A Thousand Dreams: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside and the Fight for Its Future

A Thousand Dreams is a very thorough, if partisan, overview of the events in the Downtown Eastside (DES) over the last twenty years. The partisan aspect is due to the overwhelming voice of Larry Campbell...

Review by Gordon Roe


Book Review

The Aquaculture Controversy in Canada: Activism, Policy, and Contested Science

There are few issues in British Columbia more divisive than aquaculture. With their new book, Nathan Young and Ralph Matthews provide a timely, well-documented, and clearly articulated step back from the aquaculture fray. The impetus...

Review by Jaime Yard


Book Review

Municipalities and Multiculturalism: The Politics of Immigration in Toronto and Vancouver

Kristin R. Good, a political scientist, accomplished two main objectives in this book: (1) investigating how and why municipalities responded to dramatic changes in their ethno-cultural composition and (2) evaluating her findings about municipal multicultural...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Greenscapes: Olmsted’s Pacific Northwest

This book is about John Charles Olmsted, the nephew cum stepson of Frederick Law Olmsted Sr., the renowned landscape architect of New York’s Central Park. The senior Olmsted created an urban plan for Tacoma in...

Review by Larry McCann


Book Review

Treaty Talks in British Columbia: Building a New Relationship 3rd edition

The onset of modern treaty negotiations in British Columbia, in 1993, was greeted with a good measure of optimism. The treaty process, it was hoped, would resolve the long-standing “Indian land question,” meeting both First...

Review by Brian Egan


Book Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Book Review

Women on Ice: The Early Years of Women’s Hockey in Western Canada

In January 1997 the Gateway, the University of Alberta’s student newspaper, reported on the first game played by the Pandas, the women’s hockey team: “it was fascinating to watch these women playing their hearts out,...

Review by David Mills


Book Review

The Final Forest: Big Trees, Forks, and the Pacific Northwest

Telling the story of the timber wars in the national forests of the Pacific Northwest is a task that has moved from journalism to history, William Dietrich suggests in this 2010 edition of The Final...

Review by Emily Davis


Book Review

Speaking for a Long Time: Public Space and Social Memory in Vancouver

  Mike Davis claims that ours is a time when the lived geographies of privilege and marginality intersect with an ever-diminishing regularity [1]. If he is right, then critical urban research that attempts to understand how new...

Review by David Hugill


Book Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson