We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (408)

Review

Municipalities and Multiculturalism: The Politics of Immigration in Toronto and Vancouver

Kristin R. Good, a political scientist, accomplished two main objectives in this book: (1) investigating how and why municipalities responded to dramatic changes in their ethno-cultural composition and (2) evaluating her findings about municipal multicultural...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Militant Minority: British Columbia Workers and the Rise of a New Left, 1948-1972

Labour historians have been arguing about the left in British Columbia politics and labour for ages. Now, through a skilful conversion of his 2008 University of New Brunswick dissertation “Tug of War,” University of Victoria...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

Our Friend Joe: The Joe Fortes Story

As one Daily Province journalist put it in 1916, “to write an article about English Bay without referring to Joe Fortes, would be like Hamlet without the Prince” (118). For nearly forty years the legendary...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Review

Campbell River: Gateway to the Inside Passage, Including Strathcona, the Discovery Islands and the Mainland Inlets

Campbell River, Gateway to the Inside Passage offers a fresh look at the Campbell River area, mainly seen through the lens of Boomer Jerritt, whose striking images comprise a large portion of the book. The...

Review by Catherine Gilbert


Review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

Review by Judy Campbell


Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Review

Trauma Farm: A Rebel History of Rural Life

Brian Brett’s book certainly has a catchy title. Even better, the book lives up to it, providing a unique interpretation of the dying art of the family farm, which has been a common institution in...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Review

Return to Northern British Columbia: A Photojournal of Frank Swannell, 1929-39

This is the third and final instalment in Jay Sherwood’s series about the work of provincial land surveyor Frank Swannell. It describes Swannell’s activities during the 1930s, including several seasons spent in areas of northern...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Fort St. James and New Caledonia: Where British Columbia Began

Many residents of British Columbia are probably unaware that the settler history of the province began not in the Fraser Valley but in New Caledonia, the north-central interior, a result not of the explorations of...

Review by William Morrison


Review

Becoming British Columbia: A Population History

If Canada, as William Lyon Mackenzie King once quipped, has too much geography, John Belshaw might well reply that Canadian historiography has too little demography. Regional historical writing, including that found in British Columbia, has...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Cascadia: The Elusive Utopia – Exploring the Spirit of the Pacific Northwest

Fourteen individually authored chapters (and several supplements) reflect on a shared and bifurcated bioregion and, in the process, assemble the varied ways in which the designation “Cascadia” has been applied. Among the surprises in the...

Review by Laurie Ricou


Review

Brian Jungen

The book provides an overview of the career of the artist Brian Jungen, consisting of essays by Daina Augaitis and four other notable curators — Cuauhtémoc Medina, Ralph Rugoff, Kitty Scott, and Trevor Smith. The...

Review by Geoffrey Carr


Review

All that We Say Is Ours: Guiyaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation

Guujaaw and the Reawakening of the Haida Nation: All That We Say Is Ours is a human interest story around issues of Aboriginal title and rights. Ian Gill is an award-winning journalist, author, and the...

Review by E.R. Atleo


Review

Comrades and Critics: Women, Literature, and the Left in 1930s Canada

Canada’s best-known female literary writers from the 1930s are all closely associated with British Columbia: activist wordsmith Dorothy Livesay, then a member of the Communist Party, who first moved to Vancouver in 1936; Anne Marriott,...

Review by Carole Gerson


Review

The Law of the Land: The Advent of the Torrens System in Canada

In recent years both imperial historians and colonial legal historians have begun turning their attention to the networks at play within the British Empire and the transmission of information and ideas within the imperial system.[1]...

Review by John McLaren


Review

Two Houses Half-Buried in Sand: Oral Traditions of the Hul’q’umi’num Coast Salish of Kuper Island and Vancouver Island

Huy tseep q’u, ah siem In a period marred by unemployment and economic hardships, Beryl Mildred Cryer, a Chemainus housewife, mother, and part-time journalist, set out to introduce the world to the oral traditions of...

Review by Sarah Morales


Review

Vancouver: No Fixed Address

What stays with you after watching Charles Wilkinson’s new documentary, Vancouver: No Fixed Address, is its beautiful cinematography. Vancouver’s ideal location at the intersection of the ocean, the mountains, and the sky is captured brilliantly: every shot...


Review

Farm Workers in Western Canada: Injustices and Activism

Shirley McDonald and Bob Barnetson’s edited volume Farm Workers in Western Canada: Injustices and Activismprovides a unique and interdisciplinary approach to understanding the role farm workers occupy in the complex industrial agriculture system. McDonald and Barnetson...

Review by Nick Fast