We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (242)

Book Review

The Inverted Pyramid

In 2011, the Association of Book Publishers of British Columbia celebrated Vancouver’s 125th anniversary with the Vancouver Legacy Book Collection, reissuing ten books that it deemed best representative of British Columbia’s social and literary history....

Review by Sinead Earley


Book Review

K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer

Jennifer Kramer’s book K’esu’: The Art and Life of Doug Cranmer was written to accompany the Museum of Anthropology’s 2012 landmark retrospective exhibit about the life and work of the internationally renowned Kwakwaka’wakw artist Doug...

Review by Carolyn Butler Palmer


Book Review

Above the Bush: A Century of Climbing on Vancouver Island, 1912-2012

In 1968, Mike Walsh did a solo ascent of Vancouver Island’s second highest peak, Mount Colonel Foster in Strathcona Park, “without rope or pitons,” an approach he did not recommend to others (67). Reporting on...

Review by Jenny Clayton


Book Review

The Natural History of Canadian Mammals

In this app-abundant world, it may not come as a surprise that there are multiple apps that act as reference guides for species identification, so that with the click of a smart mobile device, users...

Review by Rosemary-Claire Collard


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin


Book Review

Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows of BC’s South Coast

The Garry oak meadows of southern Vancouver Island are among the rarest ecosystems in Canada. In Gardens Aflame, Maleea Acker takes on the ambitious goal of relating the history and ecology of Garry oak meadows,...

Review by Jenny McCune


Book Review

The Principle of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis

Do the theories and worldviews of the Enlightenment unfold all there is to know about reality? Can the political relationships between Canadians and Indigenous peoples be mended solely through Eurocentric remedies? Can settler Canadians and...

Review by Damien Lee


Book Review

Murder in the Chilcotin

Author Roy Innes can be forgiven for his less than stellar accuracy in depicting the Cariboo Chilcotin in his recent crime novel, Murder in the Chilcotin. His story-telling prowess, captivating story line, and intriguing plot...

Review by Sage Birchwater


Book Review

Angus McDonald of the Great Divide: The Uncommon Life of a Fur Trader 1816-1889

The Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) has been the source for North American historians since the late nineteenth century. From the beginnings of it adventures in the fur trade, the Company’s head office in London sent...

Review by Deidre Simmons


Book Review

The Life and Art of Mildred Valley Thorton

Sheryl Salloum’s new book The Life and Art of Mildred Valley Thornton explores why this important BC artist has generally been ignored in the historical record and cultural landscape of this province. Given that she...

Review by Erin Ramlo


Book Review

Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror

In Seeing Reds: The Red Scare of 1918-1919, Canada’s First War on Terror, Daniel Francis provides an overview of the response of the Canadian state and elite to the postwar labour revolt. Although written for...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality, and the Law in the North American West

  Nayan Shah observes that historians get it wrong when they privilege permanent populations over transient, the nuclear family over other domestic arrangements, and polarized rather than various gender roles. He complains – fairly —...

Review by Hugh Johnston


Book Review

Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians

Francis Hern’s Yip Sang and the First Chinese Canadians is the biography of a prominent merchant in Vancouver’s Chinatown in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The story begins with Yip Sang’s arrival in...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society

Westward Bound is a work of remarkable scope and depth. Covering the period from 1886 to 1940, Lesley Erickson uses records from local courts, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the North West Mounted Police...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War: Intelligence, Strategy, and the Far East Crisis

Canada’s Road to the Pacific War examines the role of intelligence in Canadian strategic planning during the year preceding the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Drawing on archival resources in Canada, Britain, and the United...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

All Roads Lead to Wells: Stories of the Hippie Days

The growing literature about hippies demonstrates that the phenomenon was anything but uniform. Joy Inglis, in a privately printed book, describes one manifestation: a commune on Quadra Island that was established in 1968 by Antioch...

Review by David Stouck


Book Review

After Canaan: Essays on Race, Writing, and Region

It has been three years since we have seen a major critical monograph published in the field of black Canadian cultural studies. The last was Katherine McKittrick and Clyde Wood’s significant edited collection, Black Geographies...

Review by Karina Vernon


Book Review

Contesting White Supremacy: School Segregation, Anti-Racism, and the Making of Chinese Canadians

In September 1922, the Victoria, B.C. school board ordered 155 Chinese children (97 were Canadian-born and many spoke only English) to leave its regular elementary schools and move to segregated schools which only they would...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

These Mysterious People: Shaping History and Archaeology in a Northwest Coast Community

In the summer of 1968, my grandmother would sometimes take my young aunt and uncle to the northern bank of the outflow of the Fraser River to dig for “Indian treasure” at the Marpole Midden....

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Book Review

Whoever Gives us Bread: The Story of Italians in British Columbia

More than twenty years ago, Gabriele Scardellato lamented the dearth of attention to Italian Canadians living “beyond the frozen wastes” (Scardellato 1989). There have been modest advances since that time, including Patricia K. Wood’s Nationalism...

Review by Stephen Fielding


Book Review

Shore, Forest and Beyond: Art From the Audain Collection

At the beginning of the twentieth century British Columbia had a reputation for being a place where, as one journalist at Vancouver’s Province (16 October 1904) put it, there was little support for the province’s “gallant little...

Review by Maria Tippett