We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (66)

Book Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Book Review

The Reluctant Land: Society, Space, and Environment in Canada before Confederation

This ambitious book takes up the daunting challenge of surveying Canada’s evolution from the 1500s to the 1870s. Cole Harris’ long and distinguished career as a historical geographer with exceptionally wide-ranging interests provide him with...

Review by Allan Greer


Book Review

The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada to 1915

This sophisticated and engaging book has much to offer a number of scholarly areas, including Canadian history, gender studies, and political and legal studies. Working from a massive bedrock of diverse primary materials, Sarah Carter...

Review by Katie Pickles


Book Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Book Review

States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century

The publication of Tina Loo’s States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century marks the coming of age of the field of Canadian environmental history. In some respects, this statement may seem over...

Review by Billy Parenteau


Book Review

In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada

The issue of voice, its recuperation and responsible representation, has long ranked among Aboriginal history’s central concerns. In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada shares this commitment. Refuting...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Book Review

Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley

The cover of this atlas is engaging [1]. The muted grey, black, and red jacket offers an intriguing bird’s-eye view of Vancouver in 1912, looking west from New Westminster to Stanley Park. The heavy antique...

Review by Sally Hermansen


Book Review

Stanley Park’s Secret: The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point

Jean Barman brings clarity to a long misunderstood part of the early history of Vancouver and British Columbia. Building upon earlier re-search on Stanley Park by William C. McKee (Urban History Review 3 [1978]), Robert...

Review by Sean Kheraj


Book Review

Atlas of Pacific Salmon

Journalist Timothy Egan once wrote that the Pacific Northwest “is wherever the salmon can get to.” As woefully provincial as he was, Egan unwittingly revealed the absence of an alternative way to regionalize the seven...

Review by Joseph Taylor


Book Review

When Coal Was King: Ladysmith in the Coal-Mining Industry on Vancouver Island

WHEN COAL WAS KING, Ladysmith was a small, undistinguished pit-town, one of thousands around the industrializingworld. On the eve of the Great War, Ladysmith’s population barely passed 3,200. Compared with Nanaimo or Cumberland, let alone...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Winging Home: A Palette of Birds

At the risk of categorizing an uncategorizable book, I feel compelled to acknowledge a trend among “nature poets” in Canada that sees many of them exploring in nonfiction prose what they typically reserve for poetry....

Review by Travis Mason


Book Review

Beaten Down: A History of Interpersonal Violence in the West

DAVID PETERSON DEL MAR’S work on violence against wives is well known to social and legal historians, and in this important, innovative, and provocative new book, he has broadened his approach to examine interpersonal violence...

Review by Jim Phillips


Book Review

Women and the White Man’s God: Gender and Race in the Canadian Mission Field

THOUGH THE ENCOUNTER between missionaries and Aboriginals continues to fascinate, the tables have dramatically turned. Where once missionaries saw it as part of their task to explain Aboriginal culture to a White society, in today’s...

Review by Margaret Die


Book Review

Colonization and Community: The Vancouver Island Coalfield and the Making of the British Columbian Working Class

JOHN DOUGLAS BELSHAW has provided the historical community with a well-researched, artfully written, and well-indexed account of an important aspect of Vancouver Island coalmining history: the experience of nineteenth-century British immigrant miners. He gives the...

Review by Lynne Bowen


Book Review

Nature and Human Societies: Canada and Arctic North America: An Environmental History

In the three decades since environmental history burst onto the academic scene in the United States in the early 1970s, the field experienced impressive growth among American scholars and internationally in arenas such as South...

Review by John Sandlos


Book Review

Dark Storm Moving West

“The trouble with narrative – telling stories, making histories,” Australian ethnohistorian Greg Dening says, “is that it is so easy, but thinking about it is so hard” (Performances, 1996). I suspect Barbara Belyea would agree,...

Review by Matt Dyce


Book Review

The Land of Heart’s Delight: Early Maps and Charts of Vancouver Island

As a subject for cartography and historical geography, Vancouver Island has many attractions. Islands are uniquely advantaged in this regard, bordered as they are by waters and seas. The Enlightenment demanded scientific designations and definitions...

Review by Barry Gough