We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (150)

Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

The Many Voyages of Arthur Wellington Clah: A Tsimshian Man on the Pacific North West Coast

In 1900, after almost fifty years of assiduously keeping a daily diary, Tsimshian leader and Christian, Arthur Wellington Clah, feared he was losing his sight. “But my Lord Jesus Christ push my heart to write...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Book Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Book Review

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las; Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom follows one woman’s involvement with “colonial interventions” (407) into Kwa’waka’wakw economics, government, and religion in the late nineteenth and early...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Book Review

The Principle of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis

Do the theories and worldviews of the Enlightenment unfold all there is to know about reality? Can the political relationships between Canadians and Indigenous peoples be mended solely through Eurocentric remedies? Can settler Canadians and...

Review by Damien Lee


Book Review

Discovering Indigenous Lands: The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies

This brilliant volume of comparative law is written by four distinguished Indigenous legal academic specialists, from the United States (Eastern Shawnee Tribe), New Zealand (Maori — Ngati Rawkawa and Ngati Ranginui), Australia (Eualayai/Gammilaroi), and Canada...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Book Review

The Chuck Davis History of Metropolitan Vancouver

Everyone who has spent any time researching Vancouver history seems to have a Chuck Davis story. Here’s mine. It’s about 1980, I’m a callow not-easily-impressed grad student doing work on some arcane heritage tax law...

Review by John Belshaw


Book Review

Dim Sum Stories: A Chinatown Childhood

Vancouver’s Chinatown has been the subject of numerous notable academic studies, providing a focus that has proven to be essential to the Canadian historical narrative. In analyzing the history of Vancouver’s Chinatown, scholars have made...

Review by LiLynn Wan


Book Review

The Cannibal Spirit

Harry Whitehead’s novel The Cannibal Spirit fictionalizes one of the most important figures in the history of BC anthropology, Franz Boas’s long-time collaborator George Hunt. With many points of reference to Joseph Conrad’s Heart of...

Review by Judith Berman


Book Review

Westward Bound: Sex, Violence, the Law, and the Making of a Settler Society

Westward Bound is a work of remarkable scope and depth. Covering the period from 1886 to 1940, Lesley Erickson uses records from local courts, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the North West Mounted Police...

Review by Chris Herbert


Book Review

Front Lines: Portraits of Caregivers in Northern British Columbia

“I always seem to get inspiration and renewed vitality by contact with this great novel land of yours….”[1] So said Prime Minister Winston Churchill to Vice President Richard Nixon, in June 1954, at a British...

Review by Pamela Ratner


Book Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Book Review

Challenging Traditions: Contemporary First Nations Art of the Northwest Coast

This generously illustrated exhibition catalogue introduces the work of forty contemporary First Nations artists, ranging from emerging practitioners such as Shawn Hunt and Alano Edzerza to internationally renowned individuals such as Robert Davidson and Susan...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Book Review

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

Keith Thor Carlson’s book focuses on the relationship between history and identity among the Stó:lō people of the Lower Fraser River between 1780 and 1906. He examines specific events and broad trends to demonstrate how...

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker


Book Review

Urbanizing Frontiers: Indigenous Peoples and Settlers in 19th-Century Pacific Rim Cities

    Colonists seldom embarked alone to new continents, and so the act of “settling” was often the act of creating a “settlement.” Penelope Edmonds’s Urbanizing Frontiers reminds us that the interface between settler and...

Review by John Lutz


Book Review

Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture.

The unique circumstances of indigenous women are often overlooked in the literature on both mainstream feminism and indigenous activism. Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture is thus a welcome addition to the existing scholarship....

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

Colonial Proximities: Crossracial Encounters and Juridical Truths in British Columbia, 1871-1921

Colonial Proximities is a good book about an important subject: how colonial authorities, anxious about racial difference, tried to use legal and other strategies to regulate and restrict interracial “encounters” during the half-century after confederation...

Review by Hamar Foster


Book Review

Missing Women, Missing News: Covering Crisis in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

In a publication coincident with the launch of the inquiry into the police investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton, David Hugill’s Missing Women, Missing News poses a vital and timely challenge to common-sense frames...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Book Review

Aboriginal Title and Indigenous Peoples: Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

“It is inconceivable, I think,” asserted Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1969, “that in a given society, one section of the society have a treaty with the other section of the society. We must be...

Review by Cairns Alan


Book Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Book Review

Making the News: A Times Colonist Look at 150 Years of History

Dave Obee states in the introduction to this book that his purpose is to “give you glimpses of the people and events that shaped our community and our province” (1). In this goal, Obee succeeds...

Review by Kenton Storey


Book Review

The Last Best West: An Exploration of Myth, Identity and Quality of Life in Western Canada

The Last Best West is an eclectic collection of chapters based loosely on the meaning and mythology of the advertising slogan used by the Canadian government around the turn of the twentieth century to attract...

Review by Ken Favrholdt