We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (699)

Book Review

The Inverted Pyramid

In 2011, the Association of Book Publishers of British Columbia celebrated Vancouver’s 125th anniversary with the Vancouver Legacy Book Collection, reissuing ten books that it deemed best representative of British Columbia’s social and literary history....

Review by Sinead Earley


Book Review

Debating Dissent: Canada and the Sixties

Generation has dominated sixties scholarship since the baby-boomers came of age in the 1960s. Early historical scholarship, often written by those who participated in the events, emphasized a rupture with the past. These writers focused...

Review by Nancy Janovicek


Book Review

The Canadian Pacific’s Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The CPR steam years, 1905-1949

While the roundhouses are now mostly silent and only the occasional freight train makes its way up and down the island, the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N) occupies a prominent place in Vancouver Island’s history....

Review by David Hill-Turner


Book Review

Perfect Youth: The Birth of Canadian Punk

As the angry, impetuous, and disobedient stepchild of rock-and-roll, punk has become an increasingly popular topic for academic and popular writers. Yet, as Sam Sutherland’s Perfect Youth demonstrates, Canadian contributions have often gone unnoticed. In...

Review by Eryk Martin


Book Review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Book Review

Cartographies of Violence: Japanese Canadian Women, Memory, and the Subjects of the Internment

In the second chapter of her powerful book, Mona Oikawa indicts the critical reception of well-known Japanese-Canadian representations of Internment. Readings of Muriel Kitagawa’s This is My Own, for example, have tended to “exceptionalize” it...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Asserting Native Resilience: Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Face the Climate Crisis

For the past five centuries, Indigenous people of the Pacific Rim have been on the receiving, destructive end of European expansion and technology, witnessing their lands occupied by extractive, industrialized nation states. Now assimilated into...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Saanich Ethnobotany: Culturally Important Plants of the WSANEC People

In Saanich Ethnobotany, Nancy Turner and Richard Hebda describe the land and vegetation of W̱SÁNEĆ (Saanich), examine the “many interrelationships between people and plants” (11), and explore the traditional ecological knowledge that allowed local First...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Book Review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Book Review

Subverting Exclusion: Transpacific Encounters with Race, Caste, and Borders, 1885-1928

In 1871 in the process of dismantling the mibun or caste system that had been the basis of Japanese politics and society for hundreds of years, the fledgling Meiji government emancipated the buraku jūmin, or...

Review by Joel Legassie


Book Review

More English than the English: A Very Social History of Victoria

  In “Tracing the Fortunes of Five Founding Families of Victoria” (BC Studies 115/116 1998/1999), Sylvia Van Kirk revealed the mixed cultural background of some of Victoria’s most important settler families (the Douglases, Tods, Works,...

Review by Terry Reksten


Book Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Flyover: British Columbia’s Cariboo Chilcotin Coast. An Aviation Legacy

In his latest publication, Chris Harris views the Cariboo, Chilcotin, and Coast region of south central British Columbia, the base for his numerous books, from a new perspective derived from a series of flights over...

Review by Jay Sherwood


Book Review

First Person Plural: Aboriginal Storytelling and the Ethics of Collaborative Authorship

While Sophie McCall’s book is aimed primarily at readers of Aboriginal literary studies, she hopes that her book also will be of interest to “scholars investigating the problem of textualizing Aboriginal oral narrative.” This review...

Review by Neil Vallance


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

The Many Voyages of Arthur Wellington Clah: A Tsimshian Man on the Pacific North West Coast

In 1900, after almost fifty years of assiduously keeping a daily diary, Tsimshian leader and Christian, Arthur Wellington Clah, feared he was losing his sight. “But my Lord Jesus Christ push my heart to write...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin