We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (732)

Book Review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Book Review

More English than the English: A Very Social History of Victoria

  In “Tracing the Fortunes of Five Founding Families of Victoria” (BC Studies 115/116 1998/1999), Sylvia Van Kirk revealed the mixed cultural background of some of Victoria’s most important settler families (the Douglases, Tods, Works,...

Review by Terry Reksten


Book Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Book Review

Home Truths: Highlights from BC History

As co-editors of BC Studies, Richard Mackie and Graeme Wynn surveyed all the essays published in the journal since it first appeared in 1968 before deciding to focus on what they concluded were two dominant...

Review by J.I. Little


Book Review

Mystery Islands: Discovering the Ancient Pacific

Drawing on experience gained from travel writing assignments, Salt Spring author Tom Koppel tackles an ambitious subject, the peopling of the Pacific Ocean, with a book of interesting anecdotes and information set within a larger,...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

Flyover: British Columbia’s Cariboo Chilcotin Coast. An Aviation Legacy

In his latest publication, Chris Harris views the Cariboo, Chilcotin, and Coast region of south central British Columbia, the base for his numerous books, from a new perspective derived from a series of flights over...

Review by Jay Sherwood


Book Review

First Person Plural: Aboriginal Storytelling and the Ethics of Collaborative Authorship

While Sophie McCall’s book is aimed primarily at readers of Aboriginal literary studies, she hopes that her book also will be of interest to “scholars investigating the problem of textualizing Aboriginal oral narrative.” This review...

Review by Neil Vallance


Book Review

Civilizing the Wilderness: Culture and Nature in Pre-Confederation Canada and Rupert’s Land

  Newcomers to Canada and Rupert’s Land in the mid-nineteenth century brought with them an assortment of cultural baggage. A. A. den Otter reveals that the twinned concepts of “civilization” and “wilderness” formed the dominant...

Review by Jonathan Clapperton


Book Review

The Many Voyages of Arthur Wellington Clah: A Tsimshian Man on the Pacific North West Coast

In 1900, after almost fifty years of assiduously keeping a daily diary, Tsimshian leader and Christian, Arthur Wellington Clah, feared he was losing his sight. “But my Lord Jesus Christ push my heart to write...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Book Review

A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

This is a book about people in small towns in the west, and the rodeos that have provided ways to negotiate their complex social, economic, and cultural relationships with each other and with the animals...

Review by J. Chamberlin


Book Review

“We are Still Didene”: Stories of Hunting and History from Northern British Columbia

We read this book as the British Columbia government announced that oil and gas development will be banned in the “Sacred Headwaters,” the vast tract of land in North Central British Columbia where the Nass,...

Review by Jillian Ridington


Book Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Book Review

Gathering Places: Aboriginal and Fur Trade Histories

Academic publishers seem to be shying away from festschriften these days, but there are good reasons for UBC Press to buck that trend with this book. The long-standing academic tradition of a scholar’s colleagues and...

Review by Scott Stephen


Book Review

Epidemic Encounters: Influenza, Society, and Culture in Canada, 1918-20

Epidemics call out the ambulance-chaser in all of us, and for health historians, there is none more attention-grabbing than the 1918-20 influenza pandemic, mistakenly dubbed the “Spanish Flu,” the only infectious disease to stop the...

Review by Megan Davies


Book Review

The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The Dunsmuir Years: 1884-1905

Originally, Robert Dunsmuir, the founder of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N), had intended the southern terminus to be Esquimalt and the northern terminus to be Nanaimo, as the name suggests, but before he had...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Book Review

Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows of BC’s South Coast

The Garry oak meadows of southern Vancouver Island are among the rarest ecosystems in Canada. In Gardens Aflame, Maleea Acker takes on the ambitious goal of relating the history and ecology of Garry oak meadows,...

Review by Jenny McCune


Book Review

Murder in the Chilcotin

Author Roy Innes can be forgiven for his less than stellar accuracy in depicting the Cariboo Chilcotin in his recent crime novel, Murder in the Chilcotin. His story-telling prowess, captivating story line, and intriguing plot...

Review by Sage Birchwater


Book Review

Nowhere Else on Earth: Standing Tall for the Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest, also known as the North and Central Coast of British Columbia, is one of the last intact temperate rainforests left in the world. This region has received much attention since 1989,...

Review by Margaret (Maggie) Low


Book Review

People of the Middle Fraser Canyon: An Archaeological History

The authors, from the departments of anthropology at the University of Montana (Prentiss) and the University of Notre Dame (Kuijt), draw on their extensive and recent archaeological work in the interior of British Columbia to...

Review by Douglas Hudson


Book Review

Discovering Totem Poles: A Traveller’s Guide

This well-illustrated and modest in size guidebook presents totem poles that a tourist could see on a trip from Seattle, Washington, to Juneau, Alaska. The focus in not on totem poles as art objects displaying...

Review by Alan Hoover