We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (547)

Review

The Heavens are Changing: Nineteenth-Century Protestant Missions and Tsimshian Christianity

WRITING IN Moon of Wintertime: Missionaries and the Indians of Canada in Encounter since 1534 (University of Toronto Press, 1984, 250) of seventeenth-century Jesuit missions to the Huron, John Webster Grant quoted a Huron man...

Review by J.R. Miller


Review

On Being Here to Stay: Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada

Michael Asch has enjoyed a distinguished career as an anthropologist and original thinker. In his writing he wrestles with the big questions of Indigenous/settler relations, proposes original answers, and argues his points with elegance and...

Review by Neil Vallance


Review

For King and Kanata: Canadian Indians and the First World War

Exploring the participation of Canadian First Nations in the First World War, Timothy Winegard takes aim at two historiographical problems: the tendency to simply insert Aboriginal military contributions where they have been otherwise ignored, and...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Review

Ghost Dancing with Colonialism: Decolonization and Indigenous Rights at the Supreme Court of Canada

In this book, Grace Li Xiu Woo, a retired member of the BC Bar, steps away from a standard case law analysis and instead analyzes Supreme Court decisions related to Aboriginal and treaty rights based...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Review

Finding a Way to the Heart: Feminist Writings on Aboriginal and Women’s History in Canada

As recently as forty years ago, Sylvia Van Kirk sat in the Hudson’s Bay Company Archives in London and asked a completely new question of the business papers of this iconic and long-standing company: “Where...

Review by Frieda Klippenstein


Review

Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling, and Reconciliation in Canada

For years Canadians have been learning about the horrors of the Indian residential schools: from histories that have been written, from the 1996 report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (which blamed the schools...

Review by Daniel Francis


Review

Maps and Memes: Redrawing Culture, Place and Identity in Indigenous Communities

In this innovative and important book, Gwilyn Eades, a geographer from Terrace, undertakes a kaleidoscopic investigation of the significance of maps, cartography, contemporary geo-coding technologies (GIS, GPS, and Google Earth), and questions of spatial cognition...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

Rewriting Marpole: The Path to Cultural Complexity in the Gulf of Georgia Region

         Rewriting Marpole is the published version of Clark’s PhD dissertation (Clark, 2010) and an outgrowth of his MA thesis (Clark, 2000). The goal of his research “is to determine the spatial...

Review by Jesse Morin


Review

British Columbia by the Road: Car Culture and the Making of a Modern Landscape

Read British Columbia by the Road backwards. Or forwards. It doesn’t matter. Like the highways themselves, you can drive Ben Bradley’s bright, engaging work on automobility, identity, and landscape in British Columbia’s Interior in different directions. Stop...

Review by Blair Stein


Review

At Home with the Bella Coola Indians: T.F. Mcllwraith’s Field Letters, 1922-4

IN THE EARLY 1920s on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, twenty-three-year-old anthropologist Thomas Forsyth Mcllwraith arrived in the Bella Coola Valley to study the small community of the Nuxalk people. He would later make...

Review by Jacinda Mack


Review

The Intemperate Rainforest: Nature, Culture and Power on

WHAT IS IT THAT MAKES dancers yearn to sing or painters to write? Why are academics fundamentally unhappy within their disciplines? Inside each academician there seems to be an alter ego struggling to get out....

Review by H.V. Nelles


Review

Invisible Genealogies: A History of Americanist Anthropology

IT IS FREQUENTLY asserted that contemporary anthropology is distinctive in that it represents a radical, self-conscious departure from its earlier traditions. While accepting that this orientation has been of value particularly in exposing the baggage...

Review by Michael Asch


Review

Plants of Haida Gwaii

FOR THOSE SCHOLARS conducting research within First Nations communities at this postcolonial moment in academic history, old rules do not apply. One must navigate a rearranged landscape made up of new challenges and opportunities. First...

Review by Douglas Deur


Review

Whiskey Bullets: Cowboy and Indian Heritage Poems

The cover of Garry Gottfriedson’s book promises us a collection of traditional cowboy poetry. Exposed on a wood-grained surface are a pair of silver spurs, feathers, leather collar, and two bullets, one of which is...

Review by Connie Brim


Review

Picturing Transformation: Nexw Áyantsut

Picturing Transformation: Nexw Áyantsut is the collaborative effort of a prize-winning photographer (Nancy Bleck), a writer (Katherine Dodds), and a Squamish Nation chief (Bill Williams). The 175-page coffee-table book documents the story of how a...

Review by Dorothy Kennedy


Review

Where the Rivers Meet: Pipelines, Participatory Resource Management, and Aboriginal-State Relations in the Northwest Territories

In Where the Rivers Meet, Carly Dokis skillfully examines local responses to the Mackenzie Gas Project — a proposed natural gas pipeline through the Sahtu Region of the Northwest Territories — and how these are...

Review by Mark Stoller


Review

He Moved a Mountain: The Life of Frank Calder and the Nisga’a Land Claims Award

Like others over the course of history who have influenced fundamental human rights change, Frank Arthur Calder seems to have been born to that grand purpose. Calder’s Nisga’a elders accurately foresaw that he was destined...

Review by Katherine Palmer Gordon


Review

Missing Women, Missing News: Covering Crisis in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

In a publication coincident with the launch of the inquiry into the police investigation of convicted serial killer Robert Pickton, David Hugill’s Missing Women, Missing News poses a vital and timely challenge to common-sense frames...

Review by Tyler McCreary


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Red Light Neon: A History of Vancouver’s Sex Trade

Prostitution is a complex and politically charged issue that defies simple analysis. Daniel Francis’s new book documents attempts to regulate the sex industry in Vancouver, a city where the subject has occupied a central place...

Review by Dara Culhane


Review

Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-61

THE HISTORIOGRAPHIC trends in the scholarly literature pertaining to First Nations material and visual culture have leaned primarily towards stylistic analysis, connoisseurship, and tracing the rise, decline, and “renaissance” of this production. Ronald Hawker’s book,...

Review by Megan Smetzer


Review

Globalization and Urban Change: Capital, Culture, and Pacific Rim Mega-Projects

PDF – Hutton Review Essay, BC Studies 138/139, Summer/Autumn 2003  

Review by Tom Hutton