We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (498)

Review

Canadian Aboriginal Art and Spirituality: A Vital Link

Canadian Aboriginal Art And Spirituality: A Vital Link acknowledges right from the start that Aboriginal art forms in Canada have historically been misinterpreted as mere “craft” and that the all-important spiritual foundations of such art...

Review by William Lindsay


Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz


Review

Raven Travelling: Two Centuries of Haida Art

A book of this kind – large and sumptuous, rich with colour photo graphs of historical and more recent Haida art from the Northwest Coast, and featuring a dozen essays by Haida and non-Native contributors...

Review by Karen Duffek


Review

Making Native Space: Colonialism, Resistance, and Reserves in British Columbia

OVERVIEW  IN MAKING NATIVE SPACE, Cole Harris describes how settlers displaced Aboriginal people from their land in British Columbia,1 painstakingly documenting the creation of Indian reserves in the province from the 1830s to 1938. Informed...

Review by Val Napoleon


Review

Native Art of the Northwest Coast: A History of Changing Ideas

The essays and the many previously published texts gathered together in this weighty tome demonstrate the extent to which, over the course of the past 250 years, “the idea of Northwest Coast Native art has...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Tsimshian Treasures: The Remarkable Journey of the Dundas Collection

In October 1863, the Reverend Robert J. Dundas of Scotland travelled up the coast from Victoria to Old Metlakatla, near Prince Rupert. There, he acquired seventy-seven “ceremonial objects” from the Anglican evangelical lay minister William...

Review by Karen Duffek


Review

Wicihitowin: Aboriginal Social Work in Canada

“Wicihitowin” is a Cree word that describes the collective processes involved in helping/sharing with one another, and that is what the eleven First Nations, Métis, and Inuit social work educators across Canada have done with...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Review

Aboriginal Peoples and Forest Lands in Canada

Forests, long of economic and socio-cultural importance to both Aboriginal peoples and settlers in Canada, have also been sites of contention between these groups, reflected in blockades, court action, and state policies intended to address...

Review by Brian Egan


Review

Uncertain Accommodation: Aboriginal Identity and Group Rights in the Supreme Court of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to Aboriginal identity is fraudulent and harmful to Indigenous peoples in Canada.  This is essentially the conclusion reached by Professor Panagos in his new book.  Although this conclusion is...

Review by Larry Chartrand


Review

Shore, Forest and Beyond: Art From the Audain Collection

At the beginning of the twentieth century British Columbia had a reputation for being a place where, as one journalist at Vancouver’s Province (16 October 1904) put it, there was little support for the province’s “gallant little...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada

The issue of voice, its recuperation and responsible representation, has long ranked among Aboriginal history’s central concerns. In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada shares this commitment. Refuting...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Review

Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965-1980

Traffic: Conceptual Art in Canada 1965-1980 is the catalogue of arguably one of the most important exhibitions of Canadian art in recent history, which in turn dealt with one of the most transformative art movements...

Review by Vytas Narusevicius


Review

Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction

Jim Reynolds, a highly experienced Aboriginal rights lawyer, pursues two ambitious aims with his new book, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction. One is to provide a succinct yet comprehensive overview of Canadian law...

Review by David Milward


Review

Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations is a thorough treatment of a significant subject in BC history. Lutz has examined the history of exchanges of things, labour, and ideas between Aboriginal peoples and immigrants...

Review by Margaret Anderson


Review

Contact Zones: Aboriginal and Settler Women in Canada’s Colonial Past

This is a great time to be writing Aboriginal history. A decade of productive interplay between postcolonial studies, feminist analysis, and new methods of research has opened new interpretive pathways to historians of First Nations....

Review by Mary-Ellen Kelm


Review

National Visions, National Blindness: Canadian Art and Identities in the 1920s

Leslie Dawn makes an ambitious contribution to a hotly debated topic of Canadian cultural history – the role of the visual arts in the formation of the image of a modern Canadian nation. The title’s...

Review by Gerta Moray


Review

The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb

Everyone has met artists who triumphed at art school, who showed some promise following graduation, but who then vanished from the art world. The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb tells such a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


Review

Harold Mortimer-Lamb: The Art Lover

Harold Mortimer-Lamb lived an extraordinary life — all ninety-nine years of it. Born in England in 1872, he came to British Columbia at the age of seventeen, initially to work on Captain L.N. Agassiz’s Fraser...

Review by Maria Tippett