We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (59)

Book Review

Encounters in Avalanche Country: A History of Survival in the Mountain West, 1820-1920

Winter in the western mountains of Canada and the United States is a challenging time of year. Encounters in Avalanche Country provides insight into the experiences of trappers, miners, railway employees, and their communities in...

Review by Heather Longworth


Book Review

A World Apart: The Crowsnest Communities of Alberta and British Columbia

A WORLD APART, edited by Wayne Norton and Tom Langford, is a solid collection of essays and memoirs about the experience of living and working in the Crowsnest Pass communities of Alberta and British Columbia in the twentieth...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Book Review

The Forgotten Side of the Border: British Columbia’s Elk Valley and Crowsnest Pass

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 127, Autumn 2000  

Review by Keith Ralston


Book Review

Surveying the Great Divide: The Alberta/BC Boundary Survey, 1913-1917

Released in 2017 to coincide with national ‘Canada 150’ celebrations, Jay Sherwood’s Surveying the Great Divide also affords an opportunity to reflect on a period of productive inter-provincial cooperation a century ago, at a moment...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Book Review

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard, the new book by the noted transportation historian Barry Sanford, looks at British Columbian railways from 1925 to 1955, as depicted in ninety-nine paintings by Jacquiard. The...

Review by Ian Pooley


Book Review

The Forgotten Explorer: Samuel Prescott Fay’s 1914 Expedition to the Northern Rockies

  In 1914, Samuel Prescott Fay (1884- 1971), a Harvard graduate from Boston, ventured twelve hundred kilometres through the northern Rockies from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. While the Harvard Travelers Club deferred exploration in the...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Book Review

Now You’re Logging

Romance, high drama with runaway logging trucks (26-29), and dangerous river crossings of donkey engines (65-72) are all integral parts of this graphic portrayal of British Columbia’s coastal logging scene during the 1930s. Although Griffiths...

Review by Robert Griffin


Book Review

The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers: A History of Yukon River Steam Navigation.

Paddle-driven, stern-wheeled river steamboats evolved on the Ohio River in the 1830s into the form they would keep for the next 100 years, enabling them to serve everywhere in the vast Mississippi River basin and...

Review by Robert G. McCandless


Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Book Review

Fish versus Power: An Environmental History of the Fraser River

IN CIRCLES WHERE SALMON management gets debated, the Fraser River looms large because it helps drive a neat syllogism, which goes something like this: Columbia River runs imploded because American scientists supported a massive dam-building...

Review by Joseph Taylor


Book Review

Xweliqwiya: The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch

Xweliqwiya is the name carried by Rena Point Bolton among the Steqó:ye Wolf People. It marks an indelible position in the Xwélmexw (Stó:lō) world, relating her to a particular geography, linking her to mythological narratives,...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Book Review

Deadlines: Obits of Memorable British Columbians

The biographies in Deadlines died between 2001 and 2011, had sufficient importance or interest to be have their obituaries published in the Toronto Globe and Mail or be considered for it, and had at least...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Fernie at War 1914-1919

Wayne Norton provides a fascinating story of a British Columbia resource town navigating its way through the tribulations of the Great War.  In so doing, he adds to the small but growing body of works that...

Review by R. Scott Sheffield


Book Review

The Uchuck Years: A West Coast Shipping Saga

The Uchuck Years is the tale of how two partners managed to keep a passenger and freight service afloat on Vancouver Island’s West Coast and pass the company on to the next generation. David Esson...

Review by Kenneth Campbell


Book Review

Legacy in Wood: The Wahl Family Boat Builders

For almost half a century, the Wahl family boatyard near Prince Rupert produced high-quality wooden boats for the coastal fishing fleet. Founded by Norwegian immigrant Ed Wahl after the First World War, the boatyard built...

Review by Forrest Pass


Book Review

The Co-op Revolution: Vancouver’s Search for Food

When growers, producers and practitioners self-organize around shared interests in the local foods economy, their social and economic actions—whether through a farmer’s market, buying co-op or the production of local food—can feel tenuous on the...

Review by Diandra Oliver


Book Review

Medicine Unbundled: A Journey through the Minefields of Indigenous Health Care

Medicine Unbundled by Gary Geddes is a humanistic look at the survivors from one of our nation’s most shameful institutions alongside residential schools: segregated healthcare facilities and the treatment of Indigenous peoples within these spaces....

Review by Nicole M. Schafenacker


Book Review

Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012

  As Nancy Townshend writes in the preface of Art Inspired by the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains and Selkirk Mountains, 1809-2012: “At one time, the Canadian Rockies, Purcell Mountains, and Selkirk Mountains existed as a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

British Columbia Politics and Government

British Columbia’s unique geographical location and relative isolation in Canada makes for an interesting study of how politics can be done differently in the federation. The contributors to British Columbia Politics and Government highlight the...

Review by Allan Craigie


Book Review

Making Wawa: The Genesis of Chinook Jargon

It is difficult to research and write about the history of British Columbia without coming across snippets of Chinook Jargon. Within living memory, it was the lingua franca in coastal logging camps and salmon canneries,...

Review by Forrest Pass