We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (57)

Review

Encounters in Avalanche Country: A History of Survival in the Mountain West, 1820-1920

Winter in the western mountains of Canada and the United States is a challenging time of year. Encounters in Avalanche Country provides insight into the experiences of trappers, miners, railway employees, and their communities in...

Review by Heather Longworth


Review

A World Apart: The Crowsnest Communities of Alberta and British Columbia

A WORLD APART, edited by Wayne Norton and Tom Langford, is a solid collection of essays and memoirs about the experience of living and working in the Crowsnest Pass communities of Alberta and British Columbia in the twentieth...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Review

The Forgotten Side of the Border: British Columbia’s Elk Valley and Crowsnest Pass

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 127, Autumn 2000  

Review by Keith Ralston


Review

Surveying the Great Divide: The Alberta/BC Boundary Survey, 1913-1917

Released in 2017 to coincide with national ‘Canada 150’ celebrations, Jay Sherwood’s Surveying the Great Divide also affords an opportunity to reflect on a period of productive inter-provincial cooperation a century ago, at a moment...

Review by Jason Grek-Martin


Review

The Forgotten Explorer: Samuel Prescott Fay’s 1914 Expedition to the Northern Rockies

  In 1914, Samuel Prescott Fay (1884- 1971), a Harvard graduate from Boston, ventured twelve hundred kilometres through the northern Rockies from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. While the Harvard Travelers Club deferred exploration in the...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Review

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard

Train Master: The Railway Art of Max Jacquiard, the new book by the noted transportation historian Barry Sanford, looks at British Columbian railways from 1925 to 1955, as depicted in ninety-nine paintings by Jacquiard. The...

Review by Ian Pooley


Review

Now You’re Logging

Romance, high drama with runaway logging trucks (26-29), and dangerous river crossings of donkey engines (65-72) are all integral parts of this graphic portrayal of British Columbia’s coastal logging scene during the 1930s. Although Griffiths...

Review by Robert Griffin


Review

Fish versus Power: An Environmental History of the Fraser River

IN CIRCLES WHERE SALMON management gets debated, the Fraser River looms large because it helps drive a neat syllogism, which goes something like this: Columbia River runs imploded because American scientists supported a massive dam-building...

Review by Joseph Taylor


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Review

The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers: A History of Yukon River Steam Navigation.

Paddle-driven, stern-wheeled river steamboats evolved on the Ohio River in the 1830s into the form they would keep for the next 100 years, enabling them to serve everywhere in the vast Mississippi River basin and...

Review by Robert G. McCandless


Review

Xweliqwiya: The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch

Xweliqwiya is the name carried by Rena Point Bolton among the Steqó:ye Wolf People. It marks an indelible position in the Xwélmexw (Stó:lō) world, relating her to a particular geography, linking her to mythological narratives,...

Review by Leslie Robertson


Review

States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century

The publication of Tina Loo’s States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century marks the coming of age of the field of Canadian environmental history. In some respects, this statement may seem over...

Review by Billy Parenteau


Review

Birthright

In the last half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century, intimate relationships between indigenous women and settler men were freighted with a complicated and at times conflicting set of...

Review by Adele Perry


Review

Being and Place among the Tlingit

Being and Place among the Tlingit is a long-awaited book that draws on two decades of the author’s field research in Tlingit country. Working closely with a number of knowledgeable Tlingit elders, younger Aboriginal colleagues,...

Review by Sergi Kan


Review

Recognizing Aboriginal Title: The Mabo Case and Indigenous Resistance to English-Settler Colonialism

Australia is one of the few countries of the world where academics and politicians often debate interpretations of their country’s history in the national media. They focus on the story of Aborigine-settler relations. Even the...

Review by Arthur Ray


Review

Making Wawa: The Genesis of Chinook Jargon

It is difficult to research and write about the history of British Columbia without coming across snippets of Chinook Jargon. Within living memory, it was the lingua franca in coastal logging camps and salmon canneries,...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Mountains So Sublime: Nineteenth-Century British Travellers and the Lure of the Rocky Mountain West

Mountains So Sublime is a thoughtful study of the reactions of Victorian British travellers to the Rocky Mountain West, as expressed through their published travelogues and unpublished diaries and reminiscences. Recently retired from a long...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Becoming British Columbia: A Population History

If Canada, as William Lyon Mackenzie King once quipped, has too much geography, John Belshaw might well reply that Canadian historiography has too little demography. Regional historical writing, including that found in British Columbia, has...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

Legacy in Wood: The Wahl Family Boat Builders

For almost half a century, the Wahl family boatyard near Prince Rupert produced high-quality wooden boats for the coastal fishing fleet. Founded by Norwegian immigrant Ed Wahl after the First World War, the boatyard built...

Review by Forrest Pass


Review

An Okanagan History: The Diaries of Roger John Sugars, 1905 to 1919

Between the 1890s and the Great War the Okanagan Valley was transformed from an extensive ranching landscape into an ordered landscape of orchards and townsites. This was a result of access to the valley thanks...

Review by Paul Koroscil


Review

Evergreen Playland: A Road Trip through British Columbia

Evergreen Playland is the dvd version of the movie of the same name that was part of the exhibition “Free Spirits: Stories of You, Me and BC,” held at the Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM) in...

Review by Ben Bradley


Review

Your Land and Mine: Evolution of a Conservationist

WITHIN THE LAST two decades, several scholars have written about a number of the leading conservation activists who appeared in the United States and Canada in the crucial decades following the Second World War. Thanks...

Review by Mark Harvey