We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (309)

Book Review

A Time of Gathering: Native Heritage in Washington State

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 97, Spring 1993  

Review by Bruce Miller


Book Review

American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919-1941

THIS IS AN AMBITIOUS bookthat aims to “recontextualize, if not challenge” (9) several standard historical narratives: of the American West, of Asian American settlement, and of Filipino experiences in the United States in the early...

Review by Geraldine Pratt


Book Review

Invisible Indigenes: The Politics of Non-recognition

A TEXT THAT PURPORTS to examine the experiences of indigenous peoples on a global scale is by definition ambitious and, thus, open to a variety of critiques. These works tend to sacrifice detailed analysis in favour...

Review by Alexander Dawson


Book Review

Canadian State Trials, Volume IV

  The fourth volume of the Osgoode Society’s Canadian State Trials is a critical analysis of the powers, both theoretical and practical, of Canada’s judiciary and political executive, and how Canadian state officials used such...

Review by Scott Eaton


Book Review

Canoe Crossings: Understanding the Craft That Helped Shape British Columbia

A devoted canoeist, Sanford Osler has used his wide experience with many forms of paddle-craft to write a comprehensive and well-informed review of canoeing and kayaking in British Columbia. His up-to-date and very readable presentation...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

Selected Letters of A.M.A. Blanchet, Bishop of Walla Walla & Nesqualy (1846-1879)

During his long tenure as the founding Bishop of Walla Walla and of its successor diocese of Nesqualy, A.M.A. Blanchet meticulously copied (or had copied) his outgoing correspondence. Upon his retirement in 1879, nearly thirty-two...

Review by John Barker


Book Review

Breaking Ground: The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and the Unearthing of Tze-whit-zen Village

Breaking Ground, by journalist Lynda Mapes, is a compelling, well told story of a Coast Salish tribe in Washington State – the Lower Elwha – and its fraught relations with the settler community that grew...

Review by Bruce Miller


Book Review

Equality Deferred: Sex Discrimination and British Columbia’s Human Rights State, 1953-84

In Canada, Dominique Clément tells us, human rights legislation has been mainly associated with discrimination against women. In British Columbia, the women’s movement was deeply invested in human rights discourse and practice, and by the...

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Book Review

Is it a house? Archaeological Excavations at English Camp, San Juan Island, Washington

Synthesizing archaeological research results from the Salish Sea can be a time-consuming task because of the international boundary that currently divides the region. This is further complicated by the rise of cultural resource management archaeology...

Review by Duncan McLaren


Book Review

Moved by the State: Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada

Focusing on the “trente glorieuses” period, Tina Loo’s study of how the Canadian welfare-state pursued its promise of universality gives us an in-depth look at five communities: namely Inuit villages in the district of Keewatin...

Review by Caroline Desbiens


Book Review

Corporate Social Responsibility and the State: International Approaches to Forest Co-Regulation

Forest certification has provided fertile ground for social science research and scholarship since the early 1990s. Much of this work has focused on explaining the improbable rise and continuing global significance of the Forest Stewardship...

Review by Chris Tollefson


Book Review

The Power of Promises: Rethinking Indian Treaties in the Pacific Northwest

This multidisciplinary, transnational volume is a welcome addition to treaty literature in Canada and the United States. Situating treaty-making in the Pacific Northwest within a broader global context of imperialism and colonial indigenous-settler relations, the...

Review by Paulette Regan


Book Review

In the Spirit of the Ancestors: Contemporary Northwest Coast Art at the Burke Museum

In the Spirit of the Ancestors celebrates the Burke Museum’s contemporary Northwest Coast art collection. The writers, four academics and four artists, all have strong ties to this Seattle museum, and the artists featured here...

Review by Alan Hoover


Book Review

The Trail of 1858: British Columbia’s Gold Rush Past

After the California and Australia gold rushes, the Fraser River rush of 1858 was considered the third great exodus of gold seekers in search of a New El Dorado. At the time, it was said:...

Review by Daniel Marshall


Book Review

Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest

The authors of Before and After the State: Politics, Poetics, and People(s) in the Pacific Northwest attempt to expand our understanding of the development of two nations, and a border between them, from a mostly political story...

Review by Brandon Dimmel


Book Review

Blockades or Breakthroughs?: Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State

Canada is no stranger to Aboriginal direct action: “Oka, Ipperwash, Caledonia. Blockades, masked warriors, police snipers” (3). Citing this excerpt from the 2006 report of Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal peoples to introduce the collection...

Review by Sarah Nickel


Book Review

States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century

The publication of Tina Loo’s States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century marks the coming of age of the field of Canadian environmental history. In some respects, this statement may seem over...

Review by Billy Parenteau


Book Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Book Review

Uncertain Accommodation: Aboriginal Identity and Group Rights in the Supreme Court of Canada

The Supreme Court of Canada’s approach to Aboriginal identity is fraudulent and harmful to Indigenous peoples in Canada.  This is essentially the conclusion reached by Professor Panagos in his new book.  Although this conclusion is...

Review by Larry Chartrand


Book Review

Spying on Canadians: The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Security Service and the Origins of the Long Cold War

Spying on Canadians opens with the goal of adding “to the political demands for a new commitment for a transparency in national security appropriate to our purportedly democratic society.” (9) It is a principled point. Describing...

Review by Jonathan Swainger


Book Review

Trail North: The Okanagan Trail of 1858-68 and Its Origins in British Columbia and Washington

In Trail North, Ken Mather directs our attention to a relatively forgotten part of British Columbian history: the trails linking the interior of British Columbia to the Columbia Plateau of Washington and their contribution to...

Review by Christopher Herbert


Book Review

The Final Forest: Big Trees, Forks, and the Pacific Northwest

Telling the story of the timber wars in the national forests of the Pacific Northwest is a task that has moved from journalism to history, William Dietrich suggests in this 2010 edition of The Final...

Review by Emily Davis


Book Review

The Weather of the Pacific Northwest

Weather is a favourite topic of conversation in most places but perhaps nowhere more so than along the northwest coast of North America, a region that prides itself on a rich “outdoors” recreational culture and...

Review by Ian McKendry


Book Review

Living with Wildlife in the Pacific Northwest

THE POPULARITY OF WILDLIFE, as idea and as icon, is near universal, but the presence ofwildlife in our yards, homes, and neighbourhoods provokes reactions as diverse as the species that we encounter and the places...

Review by Lillian Ford