We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (852)

Review

Seeing Red: A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

Seeing Red is a tough read. It’s tough because the sheer amount of data gathered from Canadian newspapers ends up, at times, reading like endless lists of information, rather than a coherent narrative, argument, or...

Review by Hadley Friedland


Review

Stan Douglas: Every Building on 100 West Hastings

EVERY BUILDING on 100 West Hastings is a panorama by Vancouver’s acclaimed film and video artist Stan Douglas. Without exaggeration, it is a marvellous and monumental photograph of the façade of buildings across the street...

Review by Jill Wade


Review

Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780-1882

Let us get the quibbling out of the way first, lest it leave a bad taste in our mouths at the end. Cambridge University Press appears to have put little effort into indexing this volume,...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


Review

The Amazing Mazie Baker: The Squamish Nation’s Warrior Elder

I grew up ten minutes away from Eslha7án, the Mission Indian Reserve, in what is today known as North Vancouver, which is part of the territory of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw or Squamish Nation. Yet I...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

Creative Margins: Cultural Production in Canadian Suburbs

Alison Bain, an associate professor of geography at York University, begins Creative Margins with David Gordon and Mark Janzen’s assertion that “Canada is a suburban nation (3),” noting that our population, like that of the...

Review by Ginny Ratsoy


Review

Journey with No Maps: A Life of P.K. Page

“ Who am I,” asks the narrator in an early poem, “Arras,” by P.K. Page, “or, who am I become…?”  (144). It’s a question Page was to return to many times, in both her literary...

Review by Barbara Peace


Review

Russian America: An Overseas Colony of a Continental Empire, 1804-1867

In this important book, Ilya Vinkovetsky of Simon Fraser University places the story of Russia’s American experiment fully within the history of colonialism. Russian America was a unique colonial adventure, he argues, in which the...

Review by Stephen Haycox


Review

Learning and Teaching Together: Weaving Indigenous Ways of Knowing into Education

Students must become aware of how ambition, self-gratification, power, and control as purposes for learning are forms of self-deception that must be avoided because they lead eventually to the misuse of knowledge and the further...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

Chasing the Comet: A Scottish Canadian Life

ALTHOUGH HIS NAME does not appear in the tide, this book follows the eventful career of David Cadlow, who was born in Dundrennan, Ayrshire, but spent most of his life contributing to the development of...

Review by Michael Vance


Review

The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia

I have good reason to be eternally grateful to the author of this book on BC’s freshwater fishes. Many years ago in my first university post, when desperately seeking interesting material with which to enliven the...

Review by Tony Pitcher


Review

Unbuilt Victoria

What if? Ah yes, that perennial question. What would a city look like if the “unbuilt” were actually built? What if a municipality’s proposed plans were followed “to a tee”? Sometimes the rejection of a...

Review by Larry McCann


Review

Be of Good Mind: Essays on the Coast Salish

Be of Good Mind is promoted as revealing “how Coast Salish lives and identities have been reshaped by two colonizing nations and by networks of kinfolk, spiritual practices, and ways of understanding landscape” (back cover)....

Review by Dorothy Kennedy


Review

Nikkei in the Pacific Northwest: Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians in the Twentieth Century

This long-awaited book emerged from a May 2000 conference entitled “The Nikkei Experiences in the Pacific Northwest.” The conference was organized by the Department of History at the University of Washington (UW) in conjunction with...

Review by Yuko Shibata


Review

Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History

A primary goal of feminist scholarship and activism is to interrupt assumed notions about gender and to intervene in the naturalization of processes that perpetuate women’s op pression and subordination in patri archal societies. Contemporary...

Review by Patricia Barkaskas


Review

In Twilight and in Dawn: A Biography of Diamond Jenness

At last there is a comprehensive biography of Diamond Jenness, perhaps Canada’s greatest anthropologist, and it’s an excellent one. Barnett Richling has risen to the task with a clear understanding of the man, his remarkable...

Review by Robin Ridington


Review

Hearts and Minds: Canadian Romance at the Dawn of the Modern Era, 1900-1930

In Hearts and Minds, Dan Azoulay includes part of a 1913 letter from a young woman lamenting her lack of companionship: “although I like Vancouver very much I am not acquainted with many people, and...

Review by Megan Robertson


Review

Seekers and Travellers: Contemporary Art of the Pacific Northwest Coast

Seekers and Travellers is the final volume in a trilogy of popular publications by Gary Wyatt that showcase contemporary Northwest Coast art. It follows the format of the previous books, Faces: Contemporary Masks of the...

Review by Martha Black


Review

Local Self-Government and the Right to the City

Warren Magnusson’s reputation is secure as one of Canada’s leading political theorists, and Local Self-Government and the Right to the City offers us what he says is “probably… [his] last book” (viii). As such, it...

Review by W.F. Garrett-Petts


Review

Finding Jim

Finding Jim is an intimate portrayal of grief. In this memoir, first-time author Susan Oakey-Baker chronicles her relationship with mountain guide Jim Haberl (1958-99), a Canadian climber made famous for his 1993 ascent of K2...

Review by Zac Robinson


Review

Contours of a People: Metis Family, Mobility, and History

Self-conscious litanies of intellectual genealogy are common in volumes such as this. Although Nicole St-Onge, Carolyn Podruchny, and Brenda Macdougall have their own courses to chart, they are quick to acknowledge their debt to Jennifer...

Review by Scott P. Stephen


Review

On Being Here to Stay: Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada

Michael Asch has enjoyed a distinguished career as an anthropologist and original thinker. In his writing he wrestles with the big questions of Indigenous/settler relations, proposes original answers, and argues his points with elegance and...

Review by Neil Vallance