We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (299)

Review

No Laughing Matter: Adventure, Activism and Politics

For some readers, Margaret Mitchell’s title will bring to mind a turning point in Canadian feminists’ struggle for women’s equality: an outrageous uproar of male shouting and laughing when Mitchell, MP for Vancouver East, told...

Review by Anne Edwards


Review

Reena: A Father’s Story

There will be few people in British Columbia who are unfamiliar with Reena Virk’s name. In Reena: A Father’s Story, Manjit Virk tries to give what, in his view, is a more accurate depiction of...

Review by Margaret Wright


Review

Voices of a Thousand People: The Makah Cultural Research Center

THE MAKAH TRIBE at Neah Bay, Washington State, has become one of the most visible and controversial Indigenous communities in North America due to the media gaze on their efforts to revive traditional whaling in...

Review by Michael Marker


Review

The Origin of the Wolf Ritual: The Whaling Indians, West Coast Legends and Stories

The Nuu-chah-nulth (formerly known as the Nootka) Wolf Ritual texts re-presented here have had a complex history of authorship and availability within the BC communities from which they were collected for the Anthropological Division of...

Review by Regna Darnell


Review

Shashin: Japanese Canadian Photography to 1942

During the early decades of the twentieth century, a number of Japanese Canadian photographers established studios in British Columbia, where they plied their trade. In the process of doing so, these photographers also produced a...

Review by Andrea Geiger


Review

Kosaburo Shimizu: The Early Diaries, 1909-1926

Many ISSEI , first-generat ion Japanese immigrants, kept diaries – but rarely in English. Now, thanks to translations by his son-in-law, informed and sensitive introductions by his daughter, and the support of other family members,...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Witness to Loss

Witness to Loss is a multi-authored study of wartime Japanese Canadian confinement that draws from the memoirs of Kishizo Kimura, a Japanese-born man who immigrated to Canada in 1911. Kimura had an important impact on the...

Review by Christian Roy


Review

At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

James Teit was an amazing community-based engaged anthropologist long before such labels were invented. Wendy Wickwire’s anthropological life story of Teit is a consummate account and indeed, as the top of page advertisement exhorts, it...

Review by Charles R. Menzies


Review

Cornelius O’Keefe: the Life, Loves, and Legacy of an Okanagan Rancher

Cornelius O’Keefe was one of a small group of pioneer Okanagan ranchers who managed, in the late nineteenth century, to accumulate land, wealth, and influence. His rags-to-riches story was made possible by a combination of...

Review by Duane Thomson


Review

Suffer the Little Children: Genocide, Indigenous Nations and the Canadian State

Tamara Starblanket is a Nehiyaw (Cree) legal scholar from Ahthakakoop First Nation and is currently the Dean of Academics at the Native Education College in Vancouver, which is located on the traditional territories of the...

Review by Carling Beninger


Review

I Am Full Moon: Stories of a Ninth Daughter

About a decade ago, I wrote a review article in this journal in which I expressed the hope that more first-hand accounts of growing up Japanese or Chinese in British Columbia would be published [1]....

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

​Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse

In Emily Patterson: The Heroic Life of a Milltown Nurse, Lisa Smith transports the reader to late nineteenth century Pacific Northwest and evocatively offers a history of an extraordinary woman living through extraordinary times. Born in...

Review by Jane Errington


Review

The Spencer Mansion: A House, a Home, and an Art Gallery

Robert Ratcliffe Taylor’s The Spencer Mansion, A House, a Home and an Art Gallery is, as the title suggests, really two books. One half considers the “life and times” of the five families who made...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Sojourning Sisters: The Lives and Letters of Jessie and Annie McQueen

JEAN BARMAN’S Soujourning Sisters is an important book that merits a wide audience, consisting of both those interested specifically in British Columbia and those interested in Canadian history writ large. It recasts the notion of...

Review by Suzanne Morton


Review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

Review by Margaret Prang


Review

Land of Promise: Robert Burnaby’s Letters from Colonial British Columbia, 1858-1863

LAND OF PROMISE is a compilation of of the letters of Robert Burnaby to his family in England. These letters were written between 1858 (the first year of the Fraser River gold rush) and 1863, while...

Review by Penelope Edmonds


Review

The Many Faces of Edward Sherriff Curtis: Portraits and Stories from Native North America

I must declare an “interest” in this book. Its pictorial dimension consists of reproductions of superb sepia prints made from original glass negatives sold to the Capital Group Foundation by James Graybill, grandson of their...

Review by Mick Gidley


Review

Rain Before Morning

In the spring of 1913, sisters Leah and Elspeth Jamieson, seventeen and eighteen years old, respectively, travel on the Union Steamship Comox from Vancouver past Halfmoon Bay and Pender Harbour to their parents’ home at...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


New Media / Exhibition Review

Reflexive Anthropology on Display: Franz Boas, George Hunt, and the Co-Production of Ethnographic Knowledge

  A portion of an 1897 letter from Franz Boas to Kwagu’ł Chiefs, reproduced in English and Kwak’wala, opens The Story Box: Franz Boas, George Hunt and the Making of Anthropology, an exhibition on view...

Review by Christopher T. Green


Kwakwaka'wakw U'mista Cultural Centre Boas Franz George Hunt

Review

Rufus: The Life of the Canadian Journalist who Interviewed Hitler

Colin Castle has undertaken a labour of love. The retired schoolteacher spent four years researching, transcribing, and writing the story of newspaperman Lukin “Rufus” Johnston. The self-described “history buff” (xvii) married Val Johnston, the granddaughter...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Review

From the West Coast to the Western Front: British Columbians and the Great War

  When Mark Forsythe, host of CBC Radio’s mid-day show, BC Almanac, and journalist-producer Greg Dickson discovered that they were both involved in a personal quest to learn about great-uncles and grandfathers who had served...

Review by James Wood