We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (299)

Review

Taking My Life

In 2008, when researching Canadian women authors, Linda Morra discovered an unpublished autobiography written by Jane Rule in the 1980s, just before her retirement from writing, in which she recounts with frankness and humour her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Review

Seeking Our Eden: The Dreams and Migrations of Sarah Jameson Craig

Sarah Jameson Craig was born in 1840 in St Andrews, New Brunswick, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists, and she grew up in a log cabin in the isolated backwoods with no local post office...

Review by Lindsey McMaster


Review

The Slow Farm

A memoir, The Slow Farm, focuses largely on the brief period during which Tarn Wilson lived on Texada Island with her American parents and younger sister Rima. Arriving in 1973, the then four-year-old and her...

Review by Connie Brim


Review

Liberal Hearts and Coronets: The Lives and Times of Ishbel Marjoribanks Gordon and John Campbell Gordon, the Aberdeens

Veronica Strong-Boag announces at the outset of her latest book that “Lords and ladies are rarely in fashion for critical scholars or democratic activists. This is unfortunate” (3). Thankfully she decided to take on Ishbel...

Review by Carolyn MacHardy


Review

Liquor, Lust and The Law: The Story of Vancouver’s Legendary Penthouse Nightclub

Up to now, local venue histories have not been in great supply. Should they become a trend among British Columbia historians, Aaron Chapman’s Liquor, Lust and the Law may be seen as a pioneering effort....

Review by Vanessa Colantonio


Review

Birthright

In the last half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century, intimate relationships between indigenous women and settler men were freighted with a complicated and at times conflicting set of...

Review by Adele Perry


Review

Jean Coulthard: A Life in Music

William Bruneau and David Duke’s Jean Coulthard is a long overdue tribute to an artist and teacher whose career in Vancouver spanned more than seven decades. Composer, pianist, and music educator, Jean Coulthard (1908–2000) was...

Review by Janette Tilley


Review

Danger, Death and Disaster in the Crowsnest Pass Mines, 1902-28

The Crowsnest Pass coal-mining communities serve as the backdrop for Karen Buckley’s study of danger, death, and disaster. Her objective is to examine personal and community responses to death and to “gain a clearer understanding...

Review by Andrew Yarmie


Review

Regulating Lives: Historical Essays on the State, Society, the Individual, and the Law

REGULATING LIVES adds to a rapidly growing body of work in Canadian legal history and in the history of moral regulation. The collection should be of great interest to historians of the family, gender, race...

Review by Catherine Carstairs


Review

The Man Who Saved Vancouver: Major James Skitt Matthews

The publication of Daphne Sleigh’s biography of James Matthews coincides with the seventy-fifth anniversary of the City of Vancouver Archives, which he founded. The work is remarkable for being the first book-length biography of a...

Review by Terry Eastwood


Review

Breaking the ‘Silence’: A Review of Tong: The Story of Tong Louie, Vancouver’s Quiet Titan

THIS BOOK is a biography of Tong Louie, a second-generation Chinese Canadian businessman whose name, for several decades, has been tied to two of the most well known retail chains in western Canada — IGA...

Review by Shelley Chan


Review

Unmarked: Landscape Along Highway 16

In 1982 SARAH DE LEEUW’S father put on a suit and tie – “a rare sight,” (1) de Leeuw writes – and then left for the airport. He returned on the evening of the third...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Review

Homefront and Battlefront: Nelson BC in World War II

When author Sylvia Crooks was a three-year-old growing up in Nelson, a young man named Maurice Latornell taught her how to skate. In 1944, Latornell died during a bombing mission over Berlin. For Crooks, Latornell’s...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Review

The Land on Which We Live: Life on the Cariboo Plateau: 70 Mile House to Bridge Lake

In recent years, the historiography of British Columbia has burgeoned. Much of this rich and growing scholarship focuses on the province as a whole, or on its urban centres. We still have much to learn...

Review by Tina Block


Review

Working Towards Equity: Disability Rights Activism and Employment in Late Twentieth-Century Canada

Working Towards Equity examines the intersection of the contested nature of disability movements and activism and decision maker actions related to labour market activity in late 20thcentury Canada. Galer’s argument is that advances in labour...

Review by Mario Levesque


Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Review

A World Apart: The Crowsnest Communities of Alberta and British Columbia

A WORLD APART, edited by Wayne Norton and Tom Langford, is a solid collection of essays and memoirs about the experience of living and working in the Crowsnest Pass communities of Alberta and British Columbia in the twentieth...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

At Home with the Bella Coola Indians: T.F. Mcllwraith’s Field Letters, 1922-4

IN THE EARLY 1920s on the Northwest Coast of British Columbia, twenty-three-year-old anthropologist Thomas Forsyth Mcllwraith arrived in the Bella Coola Valley to study the small community of the Nuxalk people. He would later make...

Review by Jacinda Mack


Review

Vancouver: A Novel

RECENTLY, THERE HAS BEEN a surge in sweeping popular portrayals of Canadian history and its Aboriginal origins, most notably in the CBC production Canada: A People’s History (2000) but also in the current theatrical Vancouver...

Review by Larry Grant