We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (325)

Book Review

The Letters of Margaret Butcher: Missionary-Imperialism on the North Pacific Coast

As a study of missionary imperialism, Mary-Ellen Kelm’s edition of the letters Margaret Butcher wrote from Kitamaat between 1916 and 1919 makes an important contribution to historical conversations about the Haisla, missionaries, and residential schools...

Review by Jacqueline Gresko


Book Review

The Seattle Bungalow: People and Houses, 1900-1940

As Janet Ore says in the preface to this book, she seeks to overturn many assumptions associated with the bungalow. First, she wishes to reexamine the universality of its Arts and Crafts credentials and assumed...

Review by Sherry McKay


Book Review

Rain Before Morning

In the spring of 1913, sisters Leah and Elspeth Jamieson, seventeen and eighteen years old, respectively, travel on the Union Steamship Comox from Vancouver past Halfmoon Bay and Pender Harbour to their parents’ home at...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Phantom Limb

A phantom limb is an amputated arm or leg that feels like it hasn’t gone anywhere. At the end of a phantom arm, for instance, the fingers of a phantom hand still feel heat, the touch...

Review by Harold Rhenisch


Book Review

A Silent Revolution? Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

A Silent Revolution? is a fascinating study of female capitalists in Victoria and Hamilton at the turn of the twentieth century.  Peter Baskerville employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to establish that women were willing...

Review by Judith Fingard


Book Review

Red Dog, Red Dog

Due to the strong tourism and leisure economy of British Columbia, the Okanagan Valley has become primarily associated with orchards, beaches, and, most recently, award-winning vineyards – in short, the Okanagan Valley is synonymous with...

Review by Mark Diotte


Book Review

Backspin: 120 Years of Golf in British Columbia

Arv Olson’s second edition of Backspin expands readers’ acquaintance “with accounts of some of the people, places, and events” that shaped the 120 year history of golf in British Columbia (11). A journalist and golf...

Review by Elizabeth Jewett


Book Review

The Art of the Impossible: Dave Barrett and the NDP in Power, 1972-1975

This book is splendid work of popular political history, biography, and related media study that co-authors Geoff Meggs (a former communications director to Premier Glen Clark) and Rod Mickleburgh (a veteran of the west coast...

Review by Allen Seager


Book Review

Hearts and Minds: Canadian Romance at the Dawn of the Modern Era, 1900-1930

In Hearts and Minds, Dan Azoulay includes part of a 1913 letter from a young woman lamenting her lack of companionship: “although I like Vancouver very much I am not acquainted with many people, and...

Review by Megan Robertson


Book Review

The Life and Art of Ina D.D. Uhthoff

Like many female artists of her generation, Ina D.D. Uhtoff, née Campbell, had a difficult time sustaining a career as a professional artist. The daughter of middle-class Scottish parents, she did not lack opportunity. In...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

The Spencer Mansion: A House, a Home, and an Art Gallery

Robert Ratcliffe Taylor’s The Spencer Mansion, A House, a Home and an Art Gallery is, as the title suggests, really two books. One half considers the “life and times” of the five families who made...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Above Stairs: Social Life in Upper Class Victoria 1843-1918, More English than the English: A Very Social History of Victoria

  In “Tracing the Fortunes of Five Founding Families of Victoria” (BC Studies 115/116 1998/1999), Sylvia Van Kirk revealed the mixed cultural background of some of Victoria’s most important settler families (the Douglases, Tods, Works,...

Review by Katie Louise McCullough