We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (302)

Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Building Community in an Instant Town: A Social Geography of Mackenzie and Tumbler Ridge, British Columbia

BRITISH COLUMBIA’S single-industry communities that lie outside the province’s heartland of the Lower Mainland and southern Vancouver Island have experienced a dreadful pummelling over the last quarter century. Because of technological change, alterations in labour...

Review by Trevor Barnes


Review

Starbuck Valley Winter

YOU WON’T FIND many kids like Don Morgan these days. The plucky protagonist of this reissued children’s novel is a sixteen-year-old who hunts avidly, builds a waterwheel-driven pump to supply the farmhouse with water, and dreams of...

Review by Arn Keeling


Review

Undelievered Letters to Hudson’s Bay Company Men on the Northwest Coast of America, 1830-57

In Undelivered Letters, editors Judith Hudson Beattie and Helen M. Buss provide a voice for those North American fur trade people usually thought to be voiceless. This publication of over 200 undelivered letters to men who...

Review by Carolyn Podruchny


Review

Who Killed Janet Smith?

In late July 1924 in a house in the upper crust neighbourhood of Shaughnessy Heights, Vancouver, around midday, a Scots nursemaid was found dead in the basement by the Chinese “house boy,” Wing Fong Sing....

Review by John McLaren


Review

Writing the Okanagan

George Bowering’s new anthology, Writing the Okanagan, is a collection of Bowering’s fiction associated through setting, choice of characters, or autobiographical referents, with the Okanagan, chiefly the South Okanagan, where he grew up. Many of...

Review by Ian Pooley


Review

Last Dance in Shediac: Memories of Mum, Molly Lamb Bobak

This is a very peculiar book. Although its subject is an artist, the Vancouver-born painter Molly Lamb Bobak, the first female war artist in Canada, there is little about Bobak’s art. Molly Bobak did much more...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Masterworks from the Audain Art Museum

This large format book documents many of the significant works in the collection of the newest public art museum in Canada, the Audain Art Museum in Whistler, which opened in March 2016. In Canada, art...

Review by Jon Tupper


Review

Vancouver Vanishes: Narratives of Demolition and Revival

The cover and larger format pages of this handsomely produced book are drear images of demolition in the older inner suburbs of Vancouver. An array are pictured on the back cover rather in the manner...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

Sonia: The Life of Bohemian, Rancher and Artist Sonia Cornwall, 1919-2006

Challenged to name women artists of British Columbia of the twentieth century, most people would stop at Emily Carr. While the list of both First Nations and settler women artists of British Columbia is impressively...

Review by Kerry Mason


Review

French Canadians, Furs, and Indigenous Women in the Making of the Pacific Northwest

Since the sixteenth century, intrepid French Canadians have traversed the North American landscape to the very edges of the continent, and established families and communities in virtually every region north of Mexico. Given this legacy...

Review by Heather Devine


Review

The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb

Everyone has met artists who triumphed at art school, who showed some promise following graduation, but who then vanished from the art world. The Life and Art of Harry and Jessie Webb tells such a...

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

Walhachin: Birth of a Legend

Walhachin has a particular resonance for many British Columbians. Because of this, certain aspects of the Walhachin story have acquired a permanency and legitimacy that are not supported by what actually happened at this Edwardian orchard...

Review by Dennis Oomen


Review

Sensational Vancouver

Rumrunners, writers, aviators, architects, crooked cops, and killers are just some of the motley cast of characters populating Eve Lazarus’s Sensational Vancouver. This is her third local history book and a welcome addition to the...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Review

Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands

This multiple award-winning collection considers Aboriginal women through a regional approach. Its essays contribute to several intersecting historiographies: women’s and gender histories, Aboriginal women’s history, and biography. Beyond these, the works are unified through their...

Review by Susan Neylan


Review

The Gold Will Speak For Itself: Peter Leech and Leechtown

Vancouver Island has a distinctive personality among the regions of British Columbia, one that has been shaped in complex ways by geography and history. The books reviewed here vary in their candlepower, but all of...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Review

The Salish Sea: Jewel of the Pacific Northwest

Audrey DeLella Benedict and Joseph Gaydos’s book about the Salish Sea, like Beamish and McFarlane’s recent tome on the Strait of Georgia (or North Salish Sea), The Sea Among Us, is a gorgeously illustrated and...

Review by Howard Stewart