We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (325)

Book Review

Legacy in Wood: The Wahl Family Boat Builders

For almost half a century, the Wahl family boatyard near Prince Rupert produced high-quality wooden boats for the coastal fishing fleet. Founded by Norwegian immigrant Ed Wahl after the First World War, the boatyard built...

Review by Forrest Pass


Book Review

Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet: BC’s Japanese Canadian Fishermen

As I was reading this book in the late summer of 2009, I was struck by the sharp difference between the heyday of British Columbia’s fishing industry as portrayed in Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet...

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Seeking Balance: Conversations with BC Women in Politics

BC women have made important gains in electoral politics over the past century. In the national context, British Columbia has led the way, being the first province to elect a female premier, the first to...

Review by Tina Block


Book Review

I Am Full Moon: Stories of a Ninth Daughter

About a decade ago, I wrote a review article in this journal in which I expressed the hope that more first-hand accounts of growing up Japanese or Chinese in British Columbia would be published [1]....

Review by Patricia Roy


Book Review

Where the Pavement Ends

Marie Wadden is a non-Aboriginal investigative journalist/network producer for CBC Radio who is based in St. John’s, Newfoundland. In 1981, she shared her home with two Innu youth who came to the city from Sheshatshiu,...

Review by Shelly Johnson


Book Review

One Step Over the Line: Toward a History of Women in the North American Wests

One Step Over the Line is the second published collection of papers drawn from a conference held at the University of Calgary in 2002 (the first, Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History, was...

Review by Chris Clarkson


Book Review

Waste Heritage

The protagonist of Irene Baird’s Depression-era novel Waste Heritage is Matt Striker, a twenty-three-year-old transient from Saskatchewan. A veteran of the Regina Riot in 1935, which ended the On-to-Ottawa trek, Matt arrives in Vancouver by...

Review by Andrew Parnaby


Book Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Reena: A Father’s Story

There will be few people in British Columbia who are unfamiliar with Reena Virk’s name. In Reena: A Father’s Story, Manjit Virk tries to give what, in his view, is a more accurate depiction of...

Review by Margaret Wright


Book Review

Nechako Country: In the Footsteps of Bert Irvine

This personal history is written in concise and readable prose. It is an account of the life of Bert Irvine, an oil worker, soldier, carpenter, trapper, and wilderness guide who chose to live close to nature....

Review by James Tirrul-Jones


Book Review

Stranger Wycott’s Place: Stories from the Cariboo-Chilcotin

John Schreiber’s book reminds us that British Columbia’s landscape is defined and haunted by stories from the colonial past. As a self-proclaimed “ragamuffin out of the bush” (12), Schreiber’s narrative takes the unconventional form of...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

Race and the City: Chinese Canadian and Chinese American Political Mobilization

Race and the City approaches racism, politics, and space through a comparative case study of two umbrella ethno-cultural community organizations, one in Toronto and one in Los Angeles. Drawing from interviews with key individuals employed...

Review by Jo-Anne Lee


Book Review

The Ker Family of Victoria, 1859- 1976: Pioneer Industrialists in Western Canada

Approached by David Nation Ker to document the history of his family in British Columbia since Robert Ker’s arrival in 1859, John Adams has produced an engaging narrative, principally focused on the lives and careers...

Review by Jamie Morton


Book Review

Two Houses Half-Buried in Sand: Oral Traditions of the Hul’q’umi’num Coast Salish of Kuper Island and Vancouver Island

Huy tseep q’u, ah siem In a period marred by unemployment and economic hardships, Beryl Mildred Cryer, a Chemainus housewife, mother, and part-time journalist, set out to introduce the world to the oral traditions of...

Review by Sarah Morales


Book Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Book Review

The Man Who Saved Vancouver: Major James Skitt Matthews

The publication of Daphne Sleigh’s biography of James Matthews coincides with the seventy-fifth anniversary of the City of Vancouver Archives, which he founded. The work is remarkable for being the first book-length biography of a...

Review by Terry Eastwood


Book Review

No Laughing Matter: Adventure, Activism and Politics

For some readers, Margaret Mitchell’s title will bring to mind a turning point in Canadian feminists’ struggle for women’s equality: an outrageous uproar of male shouting and laughing when Mitchell, MP for Vancouver East, told...

Review by Anne Edwards


Book Review

The Trail of 1858: British Columbia’s Gold Rush Past

After the California and Australia gold rushes, the Fraser River rush of 1858 was considered the third great exodus of gold seekers in search of a New El Dorado. At the time, it was said:...

Review by Daniel Marshall


Book Review

Simon Fraser: In Search of Modern British Columbia

This book is not the traditional academic, well-documented research dissertation on the life of Simon Fraser. As Steven Hume states at the beginning, there was no intention of making this a “conventional biography.” This text...

Review by Brett McGillivray


Book Review

The Importance of Being Monogamous: Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada to 1915

This sophisticated and engaging book has much to offer a number of scholarly areas, including Canadian history, gender studies, and political and legal studies. Working from a massive bedrock of diverse primary materials, Sarah Carter...

Review by Katie Pickles


Book Review

The Origin of the Wolf Ritual: The Whaling Indians, West Coast Legends and Stories

The Nuu-chah-nulth (formerly known as the Nootka) Wolf Ritual texts re-presented here have had a complex history of authorship and availability within the BC communities from which they were collected for the Anthropological Division of...

Review by Regna Darnell