We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (40)

review essay

Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

Pop Culture Confronts British Columbia’s Colonial History

Grand Theft Terra Firma: A Game of Imperial Stickup, Abbotsford, British Columbia, the Reach Gallery Museum, 17 January – 7 May 2017. The exhibition is augmented by several public events, including a live theatrical performance...

Review by Erika Balcombe


Book Review

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People is a collection of mountain-inspired pieces written throughout Geoff Powter’s thirty-year career. The book guides the reader through his life’s journey as he explores mountains and...

Review by Michelle Murphy


Book Review

Kwädąy Dän Ts’inchį: Teachings from Long Ago Person Found

Sometime between 1720 and 1850, late in summer, an eighteen-year-old man was traveling in an icefield in the present-day territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, in what is now Northwestern British Columbia. Well...

Review by Jacob Salmen-Hartley


Book Review

Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough

Anyone with even the most superficial knowledge of eugenics, racism, the ‘domestication’ of women, and the history of the 20th century will know why pronatalism might ring the wrong bells. And this is setting aside...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Sister Soldiers of the Great War: The Nurses of the Canadian Army Medical Corps

During the First World War, 2,845 women enlisted as lieutenant nursing sisters in the Canadian Army Medical Corps (CAMC) (39), but over the ensuing century their experiences of service have largely gone untold. They comprised...

Review by Sarah Glassford


Book Review

Allied Power: Mobilizing Hydro-electricity during Canada’s Second World War

In Allied Power, Matthew Evenden expertly demonstrates how private and public power commissions and corporations throughout Canada expanded hydro-electric capacity in response to the ballooning demands for power and production during the Second World War....

Review by Jonathan McQuarrie


Book Review

A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes

Tom Swanky’s self-published book A Missing Genocide and the Demonization of its Heroes brings into sharp focus the problems faced by historians steeped in a discipline that does not fully appreciate the culturally constructed limitations...

Review by Chris Arnett


Book Review

The Canadian Rangers: A Living History

Today the Canadian Rangers are noted as a unique unit within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), created to establish a military presence in remote coastal and northern regions by utilizing mainly Aboriginal volunteers. Lackenbauer’s extensive...

Review by James Wood


Book Review

Charles Edenshaw

This is the catalogue for the Vancouver Art Gallery’s Charles Edenshaw exhibition. Curated and edited by Robin K. Wright, Curator of Native American Art and Director of the Bill Holm Center for the Study of...

Review by Martha Black


Book Review

The True Story of Canada’s “War” of Extermination on the Pacific plus The Tsilhqot’in and Other First Nations Resistance

One should always be skeptical of books when the title proclaims them to be the “true story” on any aspect of history. For truth, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. Tom Swanky’s...

Review by Robin Fisher


Book Review

Landscapes and Social Transformations on the Northwest Coast: Colonial Encounters in the Fraser Valley

Landscapes and Social Transformations on the Northwest Coast is a significant addition to our understanding of colonialism, settler-Indigenous relations, and human-land relations in British Columbia. Jeff Oliver’s work is part of a growing trend that...

Review by R. Sheffield


Book Review

Cartographies of Violence: Japanese Canadian Women, Memory, and the Subjects of the Internment

In the second chapter of her powerful book, Mona Oikawa indicts the critical reception of well-known Japanese-Canadian representations of Internment. Readings of Muriel Kitagawa’s This is My Own, for example, have tended to “exceptionalize” it...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


Book Review

Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Book Review

Ever-Changing Sky: Doris Lee’s Journey from Schoolteacher to Cariboo Rancher

Doris Lee’s memoir, Ever-Changing Sky, offers readers an account of the nearly twenty years she and her husband spent as owner/operators of Big Lake Ranch, deep in the heart of British Columbia’s Cariboo country. Freshly...

Review by Megan Prins


Book Review

Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered

Helen Piddington’s Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered is a collection of 117 brief reminiscences of the author’s childhood on southern Vancouver Island during the Depression and World War Two. Born in 1931, Piddington was...

Review by Christopher Hanna