We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (40)

Review

Masterworks of the Classical Haida Mythtellers

THE IDEA OF a story being as sharp as a knife, which is the title of Robert Bringhurst’s astonishing introduction to the works of classical Haida poets, is a useful proposition to consider in order...

Review by Terry Glavin


Review

A Story as Sharp as a Knife: The Classical Haida Mythtellers and Their World

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 123, Autumn 1999  

Review by Joel Martineau


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Review

Kwädąy Dän Ts’inchį: Teachings from Long Ago Person Found

Sometime between 1720 and 1850, late in summer, an eighteen-year-old man was traveling in an icefield in the present-day territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, in what is now Northwestern British Columbia. Well...

Review by Jacob Salmen-Hartley


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Cartographies of Violence: Japanese Canadian Women, Memory, and the Subjects of the Internment

In the second chapter of her powerful book, Mona Oikawa indicts the critical reception of well-known Japanese-Canadian representations of Internment. Readings of Muriel Kitagawa’s This is My Own, for example, have tended to “exceptionalize” it...

Review by Jordan Stanger-Ross


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Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture.

The unique circumstances of indigenous women are often overlooked in the literature on both mainstream feminism and indigenous activism. Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture is thus a welcome addition to the existing scholarship....

Review by Tina Block


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Comrades and Critics: Women, Literature, and the Left in 1930s Canada

Canada’s best-known female literary writers from the 1930s are all closely associated with British Columbia: activist wordsmith Dorothy Livesay, then a member of the Communist Party, who first moved to Vancouver in 1936; Anne Marriott,...

Review by Carole Gerson


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Spirit in the Grass: The Cariboo Chilcotin’s Forgotten Landscape

It is said that, in the old days, you could hear the commotion at Becher’s place as soon as your horse crested the rim of the Prairie. The old stopping house and saloon are gone...

Review by Marie Elliott


Review

The Reckoning of Boston Jim: A Novel

In the aftermath of the Crimean War, Eugene Augustus Hume resigns his commission. Later, hearing the casual remark that the charge of the Light Brigade was unnecessary, Eugene thinks to himself “The whole war was...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


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Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet: BC’s Japanese Canadian Fishermen

As I was reading this book in the late summer of 2009, I was struck by the sharp difference between the heyday of British Columbia’s fishing industry as portrayed in Spirit of the Nikkei Fleet...

Review by Patricia Roy


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Ever-Changing Sky: Doris Lee’s Journey from Schoolteacher to Cariboo Rancher

Doris Lee’s memoir, Ever-Changing Sky, offers readers an account of the nearly twenty years she and her husband spent as owner/operators of Big Lake Ranch, deep in the heart of British Columbia’s Cariboo country. Freshly...

Review by Megan Prins


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Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered

Helen Piddington’s Rumble Seat, A Victorian Childhood Remembered is a collection of 117 brief reminiscences of the author’s childhood on southern Vancouver Island during the Depression and World War Two. Born in 1931, Piddington was...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Review

Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley

The cover of this atlas is engaging [1]. The muted grey, black, and red jacket offers an intriguing bird’s-eye view of Vancouver in 1912, looking west from New Westminster to Stanley Park. The heavy antique...

Review by Sally Hermansen


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A Modern Life: Art and Design in British Columbia, 1945-1960

An early and still not inappropriate epithet for Vancouver is Terminal City. This epithet denotes not only a peripheral cultural as well as a geographical location but also the city’s potential for development, despite its...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe


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Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People is a collection of mountain-inspired pieces written throughout Geoff Powter’s thirty-year career. The book guides the reader through his life’s journey as he explores mountains and...

Review by Michelle Murphy


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Father August Brabant: Saviour or Scourge?

The numerous European men and fewer women who travelled overseas to spread a particular brand of Christianity among distant peoples in the nineteenth century are a perennial source of interest among scholars — and for...

Review by Nicholas May


Review

Raincoast Chronicles Fourth Five

The sinking of the BC Ferries vessel Queen of the North on 22 March 2006 has brought the lives of British Columbia’s coastal residents into sharp and extraordinary focus. It is a safe bet that...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


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Islands in the Salish Sea: A Community Atlas

In 1999 a small group of Salt Spring Island activists decided to mark the coming millennium by inventorying and mapping the unique resources of their island home. Inspired by bioregional writing and mapping projects in...

Review by Coll Thrush


Review

Switchbacks: Art, Ownership and Nuxalk National Identity

Jennifer Kramer’s book describes some recent negotiations of public representation and the incipient construction of national identity through the disposition of works of art by the Nuxalk people of Bella Coola, British Columbia. This book...

Review by Judith Ostrowitz