We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (20)

Review

Masculindians: Conversations about Indigenous Manhood

Judging a book by the cover, we are told, is never a good idea. In this case the artwork by Dana Claxton implies an ironic, wind-in-his-hair-style cruise down a testosterone highway. Twenty-three authors, including eight...

Review by Eldon Yellowhorn


Review

Perfect Youth: The Birth of Canadian Punk

As the angry, impetuous, and disobedient stepchild of rock-and-roll, punk has become an increasingly popular topic for academic and popular writers. Yet, as Sam Sutherland’s Perfect Youth demonstrates, Canadian contributions have often gone unnoticed. In...

Review by Eryk Martin


Review

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor

Not My Fate: The Story of a Nisga’a Survivor is Janet Romain’s account of the life of her friend and fellow northerner, Josephine Caplin.[1]  Jo was born in Smithers to a Nisga’a mother and non-Aboriginal...

Review by Carole Blackburn


Review

Time Travel: Tourism and the Rise of the Living History Museum in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada

We all remember them. I know that I do. Having spent a summer in my youth washing dishes at Fort Steele heritage town, I remember the wooden boardwalks, the ramshackle buildings, the yellow school buses...

Review by Sean MacPherson


Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

L.D.: Mayor Louis Taylor and the Rise of Vancouver

MANY NORTH AMERICAN cities have had great civic leaders. Fiorello La Guardia, New York’s Depression-era mayor, is considered the father of modern New York; Metro chair Fred Gardiner put his distinctive imprint on Toronto in the...

Review by Robert McDonald


Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Review

Empire’s Edge: American Society in Nome, Alaska, 1898-1934

How many Canadians know exactly where Nome is? Yes, we know it’s in Alaska, though the author of this book may not be confident that all readers will know, since he names the state as...

Review by William Morrison


Review

Sailing with Vancouver: A Modern Sea Dog, Antique Charts and a Voyage Through Time

In Sailing with Vancouver, the late maritime writer Sam McKinney follows the path of Capt. George Vancouver’s 1792 expedition through the Pacific Northwest’s inland waters. Part saltwater travelogue, part historical reflection, McKinney uses the region’s...

Review by Sean Fraga


Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Working Towards Equity: Disability Rights Activism and Employment in Late Twentieth-Century Canada

Working Towards Equity examines the intersection of the contested nature of disability movements and activism and decision maker actions related to labour market activity in late 20thcentury Canada. Galer’s argument is that advances in labour...

Review by Mario Levesque


Review

Swift and Strong: The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught’s Own). A Pictorial History

Having dedicated Swift and Strong “To all Dukes, past, present and future,” the authors of this outstanding volume have successfully commemorated the life and times of the British Columbia Regiment (BCR), Duke of Connaught’s Own, a Vancouver-based...

Review by James Wood


Review

A Better Place on Earth: The Search for Fairness in Super Unequal British Columbia.

This is a journalist’s book about one of the crucial issues of our time: growing inequality. As Thomas Piketty has shown in his careful study of Capital in the Twenty-First Century (2014) the tendency for...

Review by Warren Magnusson


Review

Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration

  Masculinity is not an easy concept to define, never mind Indigenous masculinities, and in Indigenous Men and Masculinities, co-editors Robert Innes and Kim Anderson don’t really attempt to define it. In the closing chapter,...

Review by Jean-Paul Restoule


Review

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada

Cultural Grammars of Nation, Diaspora, and Indigeneity in Canada is a valuable contribution to an emerging discourse within the field of Indigenous Studies. It furthers a multi-disciplinary dialogue by exploring the relationships between transnationalism, diaspora,...

Review by Gabrielle Legault


Review

Brokering Belonging: Chinese in Canada’s Exclusion Era, 1885-1945

This is a groundbreaking book in Chinese Canadian History and in the history of the global Chinese diaspora. It challenges conventional perceptions of Chinese relations with the mainstream society in Canada during the historical era...

Review by Zhongping Chen


Review

A Thoroughly Wicked Woman: Murder, Perjury & Trial by Newspaper

Betty Keller has a fascination with the early social history of Vancouver that dates back at least to 1986 when she published On the Shady Side, her lively study of crooks and cops in the...

Review by Daniel Francis


Review

The Power of Place, the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism

Keith Thor Carlson’s book focuses on the relationship between history and identity among the Stó:lō people of the Lower Fraser River between 1780 and 1906. He examines specific events and broad trends to demonstrate how...

Review by Madeline Knickerbocker