We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (44)

Review

Orienting Canada: Race, Empire and the Transpacific

The history of Canada’s Pacific relations has long been a neglected subject. The general consensus was that Pacific relations were not central to understanding the history of the country and its place in the world....

Review by Laura Madokoro


Review

Public Power, Private Dams: The Hell’s Canyon High Dam Controversy

This is a book about why something did not happen. It is not quite counter-factual history, but it is an approach that works to remind us that nothing is inevitable. In the postwar Northwest, nothing,...

Review by Tina Loo


Review

Community Forestry in Canada: Lessons from Policy and Practice

In Community Forestry in Canada, Sara Teitelbaum brings together a rich array of case studies –including four cases focused on British Columbia – that depict the remarkable variation in regional dynamics within community forestry politics...

Review by Erika Bland


Review

The British Columbia Atlas of Wellness

Maps and atlases have acquired a mystique in the lore of public health since the publication of Dr. John Snow’s famous cholera map of London in the mid-nineteenth century. Somewhere along the way, a notion...

Review by Neil Hanlon


Review

Hills of Silver: The Yukon’s Mighty Keno Hill Mine

Aaro Aho’s book serves several masters. First and foremost, it is the song of Keno Hill and those who prospected, worked, and lived the life of the rich silver-lead mines. Silver ore was first discovered...

Review by Logan Hovis


Review

Authentic Indians: Episodes of Encounter from the Late Nineteenth-Century Northwest Coast

Authentic Indians examines the pressure exerted on a minority to conform to an ideal that the majority defined by another ideal – in short, two abstractions played off one another. Paige Raibmon calls this a...

Review by Brian Dippie


Review

Tsimshian Treasures: The Remarkable Journey of the Dundas Collection

In October 1863, the Reverend Robert J. Dundas of Scotland travelled up the coast from Victoria to Old Metlakatla, near Prince Rupert. There, he acquired seventy-seven “ceremonial objects” from the Anglican evangelical lay minister William...

Review by Karen Duffek


Review

British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years

James D. Anderson’s British Columbia’s Magnificent Parks: The First 100 Years is a tribute to the first century of the Provincial Park system in BC. This thoroughly researched and richly illustrated history, sensitive to ongoing...

Review by J. Cronin


Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition 3rd Edition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Daniel Clayton


Review

Second Growth: Community Economic Development in Rural British Columbia

Recently the CBC program Ideas aired “Canadian Clearances,” a documentary about the impacts of globalization in rural Canada.1 What has come to epitomize the political activism of rural and remote communities is the depth of...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Review

The Weather of the Pacific Northwest

Weather is a favourite topic of conversation in most places but perhaps nowhere more so than along the northwest coast of North America, a region that prides itself on a rich “outdoors” recreational culture and...

Review by Ian McKendry


Review

I Am Full Moon: Stories of a Ninth Daughter

About a decade ago, I wrote a review article in this journal in which I expressed the hope that more first-hand accounts of growing up Japanese or Chinese in British Columbia would be published [1]....

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

Nature and Human Societies: Canada and Arctic North America: An Environmental History

In the three decades since environmental history burst onto the academic scene in the United States in the early 1970s, the field experienced impressive growth among American scholars and internationally in arenas such as South...

Review by John Sandlos


Review

Review

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People is a collection of mountain-inspired pieces written throughout Geoff Powter’s thirty-year career. The book guides the reader through his life’s journey as he explores mountains and...

Review by Michelle Murphy


Review

Geography of British Columbia: People and Landscapes in Transition

I was intrigued by this textbook and agreed to review it for two reasons: first, because it is more than fifteen years since I lived in British Columbia and I was keen to discover how...

Review by Ken Favrholdt


Review

Facing History: Portraits from Vancouver

FACING HISTORY: Portraits from Vancouver grew out of an exhibition at North Vancouver’s Presentation House Gallery, curated by the book’s editor, Karen Love. In her introductory essay, Love explains that Facing History “cannot be a portrait...

Review by Neil Sutherland


Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

Review by Margaret Prang


Review

The Last Island: A Naturalist’s Sojourn on Triangle Island

ONE OF THE SALIENT features of British Columbia’s geography is its myriad coastal islands. Among the wildest and most remote of these, the ecological reserve Triangle Island lies in the open Pacific Ocean thirty miles...

Review by Philip Teece