We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (22)

Review

Raising the Workers’ Flag: The Workers’ Unity League in Canada, 1930-1936

The struggle to build trade unions in the extractive and manufacturing industries of Canada — mining, forestry, fishing, clothing, furniture, and others — was meteoric and its demise equally rapid. Raising the Workers’ Flag provides...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

Militant Minority: British Columbia Workers and the Rise of a New Left, 1948-1972

Labour historians have been arguing about the left in British Columbia politics and labour for ages. Now, through a skilful conversion of his 2008 University of New Brunswick dissertation “Tug of War,” University of Victoria...

Review by Ron Verzuh


Review

David Douglas, a Naturalist at Work: An Illustrated Exploration across Two Centuries in the Pacific Northwest

In June 1824, the Governor and Committee of the Hudson’s Bay Company agreed to transport David Douglas, a young Scottish employee of the Horticultural Society of London to its “Columbia District,” to assist the society’s...

Review by Ted Binnema


Review

One Step Over the Line: Toward a History of Women in the North American Wests

One Step Over the Line is the second published collection of papers drawn from a conference held at the University of Calgary in 2002 (the first, Unsettled Pasts: Reconceiving the West through Women’s History, was...

Review by Chris Clarkson


Review

Culturing Wilderness in Jasper National Park: Studies in Two Centuries of Human History in the Upper Athabasca River Watershed

In 1910, D.J. Benham wrote of the new Jasper National Park, “Here may be seen Nature primeval, Nature benignant and Nature malignant – the glorious heritage of a Canadian nation” (xxv). People don’t really talk...

Review by Claire Campbell


Review

Whiskey Bullets: Cowboy and Indian Heritage Poems

The cover of Garry Gottfriedson’s book promises us a collection of traditional cowboy poetry. Exposed on a wood-grained surface are a pair of silver spurs, feathers, leather collar, and two bullets, one of which is...

Review by Connie Brim


Review

Your Land and Mine: Evolution of a Conservationist

WITHIN THE LAST two decades, several scholars have written about a number of the leading conservation activists who appeared in the United States and Canada in the crucial decades following the Second World War. Thanks...

Review by Mark Harvey


Review

Academic Freedom and the Inclusive University

THIS BOOK SUCCEEDS in exemplifying what it fails to define. It contains seventeen chapters written by academics from the United States and Canada – academics who occupy a variety of positions: college teacher, university administrator,...

Review by Gordon Shrimpton


Review

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest

The Horticultural Society of London demanded that David Douglas (1799-1834), their employee and North American plant hunter, keep a meticulous journal of his travels. Certainly a better field naturalist than author, Douglas refused to let...

Review by David Brownstein


Review

Literary Land Claims: The “Indian Land Question” from Pontiac’s War to Attawapiskat

Amidst the celebrations for the 150th anniversary of Canada’s confederation this year, scholars and citizens alike are calling for national reflection on what this anniversary is meant to commemorate. To this end, Margery Fee’s Literary...

Review by Megan Harvey


Review

What We Learned: Two Generations Reflect on Tsimshian Education and the Day Schools.

The impetus for What We Learned, a collaborative book written by Helen Raptis and twelve members of the Tsimshian Nation, was Raptis’s archival discovery of a 1947 class list from the Port Essington Indian Day...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

Deadlines: Obits of Memorable British Columbians

The biographies in Deadlines died between 2001 and 2011, had sufficient importance or interest to be have their obituaries published in the Toronto Globe and Mail or be considered for it, and had at least...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

The British Columbia Court of Appeal: The First Hundred Years, 1910-2010

A law court has an inner life, beyond the many outside lives that it can rescue, ruin, remedy and reward. When it is an appellate court, the urge to converge as group judgment replaces the...

Review by DeLloyd Guth


Review

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People

Inner Ranges: An Anthology of Mountain Thoughts and Mountain People is a collection of mountain-inspired pieces written throughout Geoff Powter’s thirty-year career. The book guides the reader through his life’s journey as he explores mountains and...

Review by Michelle Murphy


Review

Growing Community Forests: Practice, Research, and Advocacy in Canada

Over the past two decades, community forestry has been adopted with growing frequency across Canada. Localities have sought to balance multiple values – economic, social, environmental – within systems of decentralized forest management. Contributors to Growing...

Review by Kirsten McIlveen


Review

Too Small to See, Too Big to Ignore: Child Health and Well-being

AS THE MOST RECENT Statistics Canada reports tell us, poverty continues to stalk British Columbia’s youngest citizens. Their distress, with outcomes measured pitilessly in shortfalls in nutrition, education, and health, is directly associated with the...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Review

The Chinchaga Firestorm: When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue

Some fires are justly renowned. Some are celebrities — known for being known. A few are famous for being unknown. The 1871 Peshtigo fire in the US has long marketed itself as America’s Forgotten Fire....

Review by Stephen J. Pyne


Review

The Punjabis in British Columbia: Location, Labour, First Nations, and Multiculturalism

Kamala Elizabeth Nayar’s groundbreaking work, The Punjabis in British Columbia, represents a significant addition to a number of fields. At a basic level, it focuses on the important but sorely understudied community of Punjabis who...

Review by Anne Murphy


Review

Awful Splendour: A Fire History of Canada

For anyone familiar with environmental history, Stephen J. Pyne is as synonymous with the word “fire” as is Smokey the Bear. As a former firefighter in the Grand Canyon, a renowned historian at Arizona State...

Review by Philip Van Huizen