We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (380)

Book Review

Where it Hurts

Where it Hurts, by Sarah De Leeuw, is a collection of essays within the genre of creative non-fiction. The vivid essays express loss, trauma and humor. De Leeuw uses complex imagery that takes the reader...

Review by Melinda Kachina Bige


Book Review

Book Review

The Many Faces of Edward Sherriff Curtis: Portraits and Stories from Native North America

I must declare an “interest” in this book. Its pictorial dimension consists of reproductions of superb sepia prints made from original glass negatives sold to the Capital Group Foundation by James Graybill, grandson of their...

Review by Mick Gidley


Book Review

A Silent Revolution? Gender and Wealth in English Canada, 1860-1930

A Silent Revolution? is a fascinating study of female capitalists in Victoria and Hamilton at the turn of the twentieth century.  Peter Baskerville employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to establish that women were willing...

Review by Judith Fingard


Book Review

Passing Through Missing Pages: The Intriguing Story of Annie Garland Foster

In the early 1990s, author Frances Welwood agreed to research the life of Annie Garland Foster for a Nelson Museum exhibition, “The Women of Nelson, 1880-1950.” An early woman graduate of the University of New...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

American Workers, Colonial Power: Philippine Seattle and the Transpacific West, 1919-1941

THIS IS AN AMBITIOUS bookthat aims to “recontextualize, if not challenge” (9) several standard historical narratives: of the American West, of Asian American settlement, and of Filipino experiences in the United States in the early...

Review by Geraldine Pratt


Book Review

Reasoning Otherwise: Leftists and the People’s Enlightenment in Canada, 1890-1920

It took a mountain of labour to write this book, but the result is a molehill of meaningful history. This is the second volume of Ian McKay’s planned multi-volume history of the left in Canada,...

Review by Gary Teeple


Book Review

Svoboda

Bill Stenson’s Svoboda is a coming-of-age novel set in the West Kootenay during the 1950s. Vasili Saprikin is a Doukhobor who spends most of his earliest years with his mother (a widow) and grandfather in...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Book Review

Into the House of Old: A History of Residential Care in British Columbia

Megan Davies’s carefully worked study on residential care for the aged in British Columbia does in deed take us into the “house of old.” And it is a sad journey, made more resonant to many...

Review by Patricia Vertinsky


Book Review

The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest

The Horticultural Society of London demanded that David Douglas (1799-1834), their employee and North American plant hunter, keep a meticulous journal of his travels. Certainly a better field naturalist than author, Douglas refused to let...

Review by David Brownstein


Book Review

Belonging Métis

The title of Belonging Métis is apt because the book illuminates the common twenty-first century Métis condition of yearning for belonging. Having been alienated from their geographical homeland on the Prairies beginning in 1870 when...

Review by Jennifer Hayter


Book Review

The Importance of British Material Culture to Historical Archaeologies of the Nineteenth Century

One great irony of historical archaeology is that far more research is done on nineteenth century British material culture overseas than in Britain itself, despite the importance of the Empire and its material culture to...

Review by Douglas E. Ross


Book Review

Human Rights in Canada: A History

Human Rights in Canada: A History is a comprehensive survey of the checkered human rights pattern in this country. Dominique Clément writes of a country that in its infancy and youth had a minimal respect...

Review by Larry Hannant


Book Review

Subverting Exclusion: Transpacific Encounters with Race, Caste, and Borders, 1885-1928

In 1871 in the process of dismantling the mibun or caste system that had been the basis of Japanese politics and society for hundreds of years, the fledgling Meiji government emancipated the buraku jūmin, or...

Review by Joel Legassie


Book Review

Selected Letters of A.M.A. Blanchet, Bishop of Walla Walla & Nesqualy (1846-1879)

During his long tenure as the founding Bishop of Walla Walla and of its successor diocese of Nesqualy, A.M.A. Blanchet meticulously copied (or had copied) his outgoing correspondence. Upon his retirement in 1879, nearly thirty-two...

Review by John Barker


Book Review

Edenbank: The Story of a Canadian Pioneer Farm

ALLEN WELLS, who came west from Upper Canada for the gold rush, stayed to farm, establishing Edenbank, one of the earliest and largest farms in the Chilliwack Valley. As new settlers arrived, he encouraged “the...

Review by Morag Maclachlan


Book Review

Tsimshian Treasures: The Remarkable Journey of the Dundas Collection

In October 1863, the Reverend Robert J. Dundas of Scotland travelled up the coast from Victoria to Old Metlakatla, near Prince Rupert. There, he acquired seventy-seven “ceremonial objects” from the Anglican evangelical lay minister William...

Review by Karen Duffek


Book Review

Native Art of the Northwest Coast: A History of Changing Ideas

The essays and the many previously published texts gathered together in this weighty tome demonstrate the extent to which, over the course of the past 250 years, “the idea of Northwest Coast Native art has...

Review by Maria Tippett


Exhibition, Film, and New Media Review

The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open 

Though many will recognize Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers for her remarkable body of short and documentary films (Bloodland [2011], A Red Girl’s Reasoning [2012], Bihttoš [2014], cəsnaʔəm, the city before the city [2017]), The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open (2019)...

Review by Karrmen Crey