We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (380)

Book Review

They Called Me Number One: Secrets and Survival at an Indian Residential School

Bev Sellars’s bestselling memoir, They Called Me Number One, is a personal account of an important part of the colonial history of British Columbia told from a specific region in the province (Cariboo) and from...

Review by Jay Lewyn


Book Review

Seeking Our Eden: The Dreams and Migrations of Sarah Jameson Craig

Sarah Jameson Craig was born in 1840 in St Andrews, New Brunswick, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists, and she grew up in a log cabin in the isolated backwoods with no local post office...

Review by Lindsey McMaster


Book Review

Nothing to Write Home About: British Family Correspondence and the Settler Everyday in British Columbia

The history of colonial British Columbia is, in many respects, well-trodden ground. Over the past few decades, scholars like Jean Barman, Cole Harris, and Adele Perry have made multiple transformative contributions to our understanding of...

Review by Kristine Alexander


Book Review

Vancouverism

It’s best to start any study with a clear, concise, and irrefutable sentence. But “Vancouver is a place” is taking that axiom too far. And, as anyone who knows horses will tell you, a place...

Review by John Douglas Belshaw


Book Review

Woo, The Monkey Who Inspired Emily Carr: a Biography

“Monkey Business: Emily Carr’s Woo” In 1923 Emily Carr sent her maid, Pearl, to Lucy Cowie’s pet shop in downtown Victoria.  She gave the owner thirty dollars and one of Carr’s Griffon dogs in exchange...

Review by Maria Tippett


Book Review

Salal: Listening for the Northwest Understory

I live on forested acreage at the north end of the Sechelt Peninsula, surrounded by salal. I think of Gaultheria shallon as the signature plant of the landscape I have loved my whole life. The glossy...

Review by Theresa Kishkan


Book Review

The Lost Coast: Salmon, Memory and the Death of Wild Culture

Tim Bowling, who spent his child-hood on the west coast of British Columbia and now lives in Edmonton, is perhaps better known as a poet than a prose writer. He has published seven collections of...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Voices from the Skeena: An Illustrated Oral History

Many familiar with Imbert Orchard’s CBC radio interviews from the 1960s will welcome this publication of transcriptions of oral interviews relating to the history of the Skeena River together with forty illustrations executed by the...

Review by Ted Binnema


Book Review

Murder in the Monashees: A Mystery

Russell Montgomery, an office worker from Vancouver, has come to the Monashee Mountains for one week in the hope of shooting a mule deer stag. Through his scope, he fixes a buck, seventy-five yards away....

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Finding Families, Finding Ourselves: English Canada Encounters Adoption from the 19th Century to the 1990’s

This book is a long-overdue corrective to existing literature on the history of the Canadian family. Adoption, as Veronica Strong-Boag asserts, “is a far from marginal phenomenon in Canadian history” (vii), yet historians have given...

Review by Lori Chambers


Book Review

People, Politics, and Child Welfare in British Columbia

This is the most important book now available on children and public policy in British Columbia. Its contributions by engaged and thoughtful scholar-advocates should be required reading for all Canadians interested in the welfare of...

Review by Veronica Strong-Boag


Book Review

Constance Lindsay Skinner: Writing on the Frontier

THE SUBTITLE of this biography has several meanings. Constance Lindsay Skinner (1877-1939) lived on a variety of frontiers – geographical, social, literary, and imaginative. Skinner occupies a minor place in the canon of American literature...

Review by Margaret Prang


Book Review

Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place

Coll Thrush’s book lies at the intersection of two bodies of scholarship that usually run parallel to each other. Urban history and Indian history meet in Native Seattle with panache and authority. Thrush tracks the...

Review by Jean Barman


Book Review

Harbour City: Nanaimo in Transition, 1920-1967

Nanaimo is a perplexing place for a historian. The city’s elected officials and first Nations leaders often disregard and frequently disdain historical structures. Recently, two buildings that had been listed on the city’s heritage register...

Review by Patrick Dunae


Book Review

The Reckoning of Boston Jim: A Novel

In the aftermath of the Crimean War, Eugene Augustus Hume resigns his commission. Later, hearing the casual remark that the charge of the Light Brigade was unnecessary, Eugene thinks to himself “The whole war was...

Review by Jocelyn Smith


Book Review

Vancouver: A Novel

RECENTLY, THERE HAS BEEN a surge in sweeping popular portrayals of Canadian history and its Aboriginal origins, most notably in the CBC production Canada: A People’s History (2000) but also in the current theatrical Vancouver...

Review by Larry Grant


Book Review

Wires in the Wilderness: The Story of the Yukon Telegraph

IT WAS WITH SOME excitement and a little trepidation that I agreed to review Bill Miller’s book. First of all, my father, George Ball, was a Yukon Telegraph Line operator in the early years; and...

Review by Georgiana Ball


Book Review

Pro-Family Politics and Fringe Parties in Canada

One of the most contentious aspects of politics is the legislation of morals. How much should governments be beholden to any one set of religious beliefs held by influential minorities or a major ity? Chris...

Review by John Dyck


Book Review

Corresponding Influence: Selected Letters of Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth

This wonderful collection of letters describes a special friend ship between Emily Carr and Ira Dilworth between 1940 and 1945. Carr was already recognized as a distinguished artist, but she had just begun to write...

Review by Sandra Djwa


Book Review

The Pacific Muse: Exotic Femininity and the Colonial Pacific

In their recent edited collection, Bodies in Contact: Rethinking Colonial Encounters in World History (2005), Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton call for a renewed focus on gender as a category of historical analysis, positioning “the...

Review by Frances Steel


Book Review

National Visions, National Blindness: Canadian Art and Identities in the 1920s

Leslie Dawn makes an ambitious contribution to a hotly debated topic of Canadian cultural history – the role of the visual arts in the formation of the image of a modern Canadian nation. The title’s...

Review by Gerta Moray


Book Review

One Native Life

For much of his life, Richard Wagamese has searched for a sense of belonging and struggled to find his identity as an indigenous person living in Canada. In One Native Life, Wagamese shares an intimate...

Review by Sean Carleton


Book Review

The Trail of 1858: British Columbia’s Gold Rush Past

After the California and Australia gold rushes, the Fraser River rush of 1858 was considered the third great exodus of gold seekers in search of a New El Dorado. At the time, it was said:...

Review by Daniel Marshall


Book Review

The Rise of Jewish Life and Religion in British Columbia, 1858-1948

The Jewish Historical Society of British Columbia is to be congratulated for publishing Cyril Leonoff’s comprehensive study of the Jewish community of British Columbia from its beginnings to the mid-twentieth century as a 204-page “article”...

Review by Ira Robinson