We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (125)

Review

The Woman in the Trees

The southern interior of British Columbia is a landscape woven together by stories, from the geological chronicles of glaciers and mountains to the almost mute presences of kekuli pits, abandoned cabins, and weathered fence lines...

Review by Theresa Kishkan


Review

A Thoroughly Wicked Woman: Murder, Perjury & Trial by Newspaper

Betty Keller has a fascination with the early social history of Vancouver that dates back at least to 1986 when she published On the Shady Side, her lively study of crooks and cops in the...

Review by Daniel Francis


Review

Good Intentions Gone Awry: Emma Crosby and the Methodist Mission on the Northwest Coast

Over the years, historians have paid only sporadic attention to Christian missionaries in British Columbia. While excellent studies periodically appear, they tend to reflect themes and approaches developed elsewhere. Good Intentions Gone Awry thus reflects...

Review by John Barker


Review

Recollecting: Lives of Aboriginal Women of the Canadian Northwest and Borderlands

This multiple award-winning collection considers Aboriginal women through a regional approach. Its essays contribute to several intersecting historiographies: women’s and gender histories, Aboriginal women’s history, and biography. Beyond these, the works are unified through their...

Review by Susan Neylan


Review

This Woman in Particular: Contexts for the Biographical Image of Emily Carr

PDF – Pagh Review Essay – BC Studies 114, Summer 1997  

Review by Stephanie Kirkwood Walker


Review

During My Time: Florence Edenshaw Davidson, A Haida Woman

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 59, Autumn 1983  

Review by Maria Tippett


Review

A Woman of Influence: Evlyn Fenwick Farris

PDF – Book Reviews, BC Studies 119, Autumn 1998  

Review by Susan Johnston


Review

Written as I Remember It: Teachings (ʔəms taʔaw) from the Life of a Sliammon Elder

Sliammon elder Elsie Paul’s grandmother told her in the 1930s that knowing how to harvest food, cook, and raise children was all that a good woman really needed. It was a view said to be...

Review by Dorothy Kennedy


Review

Paddling Her Own Canoe: The Times and Texts of Pauline Johnson (Tekahionwake)

POET, WRITER, storyteller, spokesperson, performer, actress, performance artist. Pauline Johnson is certainly the most public and popular writer that nineteenth-century Canada produced, and perhaps even the most public Canadian writer of the last century. Such...

Review by Armand Ruffo


Review

Up-Coast: Forests and Industry on British Columbia’s North Coast. 1870-2005

The southern interior of British Columbia is a landscape woven together by stories, from the geological chronicles of glaciers and mountains to the almost mute presences of kekuli pits, abandoned cabins, and weathered fence lines...

Review by Duff Sutherland


Review

Phantom Limb

A phantom limb is an amputated arm or leg that feels like it hasn’t gone anywhere. At the end of a phantom arm, for instance, the fingers of a phantom hand still feel heat, the touch...

Review by Harold Rhenisch


Review

A Great Rural Sisterhood: Madge Robertson Watt and the ACWW

In A Great Rural Sisterhood, Linda Ambrose has taken on the challenging task of telling the life story of a woman who left behind no personal diaries or papers and only a fragmented paper trail....

Review by Lisa Pasolli


Review

In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada

The issue of voice, its recuperation and responsible representation, has long ranked among Aboriginal history’s central concerns. In the Days of Our Grandmothers: A Reader in Aboriginal Women’s History in Canada shares this commitment. Refuting...

Review by Chelsea Horton


Review

Kosaburo Shimizu: The Early Diaries, 1909-1926

Many ISSEI , first-generat ion Japanese immigrants, kept diaries – but rarely in English. Now, thanks to translations by his son-in-law, informed and sensitive introductions by his daughter, and the support of other family members,...

Review by Patricia Roy


Review

The Letters of Margaret Butcher: Missionary-Imperialism on the North Pacific Coast

As a study of missionary imperialism, Mary-Ellen Kelm’s edition of the letters Margaret Butcher wrote from Kitamaat between 1916 and 1919 makes an important contribution to historical conversations about the Haisla, missionaries, and residential schools...

Review by Jacqueline Gresko


Review

The Old Red Shirt: Pioneer Poets of British Columbia

THE TITLE OF The Old Red Shirt comes from one of the poems that Yvonne Mearns Klan collects in this wonderful book. The poem in question is by Rebecca Gibbs, a black woman who had established...

Review by W.H. New


Review

Wrong Highway: The Misadventures of a Misplaced Society Girl

Wrong Highway is the memoir of Stella Jenkins, a middle-class mother of four from Victoria, who in 1948, recently divorced, formed a relationship with Bob Smith, a trapper and labourer. Stella left Victoria with her...

Review by Cameron Duder


Review

The Legendary Betty Frank: The Cariboo’s Alpine Queen

As a young girl, Betty Cox (Frank) had some very non-traditional ideas of what she wanted to be when she grew up. She dreamed of riding horses, mushing dogs, and guiding hunters in the northern...

Review by Judy Campbell


Review

Stranger Wycott’s Place: Stories from the Cariboo-Chilcotin

John Schreiber’s book reminds us that British Columbia’s landscape is defined and haunted by stories from the colonial past. As a self-proclaimed “ragamuffin out of the bush” (12), Schreiber’s narrative takes the unconventional form of...

Review by Sean Carleton


Review

The Many Faces of Edward Sherriff Curtis: Portraits and Stories from Native North America

I must declare an “interest” in this book. Its pictorial dimension consists of reproductions of superb sepia prints made from original glass negatives sold to the Capital Group Foundation by James Graybill, grandson of their...

Review by Mick Gidley


Review

Where it Hurts

Where it Hurts, by Sarah De Leeuw, is a collection of essays within the genre of creative non-fiction. The vivid essays express loss, trauma and humor. De Leeuw uses complex imagery that takes the reader...

Review by Melinda Kachina Bige