We acknowledge that we live and work on unceded Indigenous territories and we thank the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations for their hospitality.

Index

Results (140)

Review

The Law of the Land: The Advent of the Torrens System in Canada

In recent years both imperial historians and colonial legal historians have begun turning their attention to the networks at play within the British Empire and the transmission of information and ideas within the imperial system.[1]...

Review by John McLaren


Review

A Matter of Confidence: The Inside Story of the Political Battle for BC

In February of 2011, I was the moderator for the BC Liberal Leadership candidates’ debate in Prince George, British Columbia. As the evening got underway I saw Christy Clark enter the room. She caught my...

Review by Tracy Summerville


Review

Mountain Timber: The Comox Logging Company in the Vancouver Island Mountains

Richard Mackie’s Mountain Timber is the second volume of a projected three-volume history of the Comox Logging and Railway Company’s operations on Vancouver Island. This volume begins c.1927 with the company’s expansion of its steam-powered...

Review by Christopher Hanna


Review

The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea

Lissa Wadewitz’s The Nature of Borders offers valuable insights into the shifting nature of boundaries on the Salish Sea and their significance for the Pacific salmon swimming through it. These fish traverse the sea on...

Review by Howard Stewart


Review

The Principle of Tsawalk: An Indigenous Approach to Global Crisis

Do the theories and worldviews of the Enlightenment unfold all there is to know about reality? Can the political relationships between Canadians and Indigenous peoples be mended solely through Eurocentric remedies? Can settler Canadians and...

Review by Damien Lee


Review

Citizen Docker: Making a New Deal on the Vancouver Waterfront 1919-1939

In Citizen Docker Andrew Parnaby explores industrial relations on the Vancouver waterfront during the interwar years. The analysis is linked to a broader consideration of the transition to the welfare state and the new industrial...

Review by Gordon Hak


Review

Life in the Tee-Pee

In the spring of 1956, the proprietors of the roadside Tee-Pee Restaurant near Boston Bar were unceremoniously informed that their business and odd assortment of buildings would be expropriated and destroyed to make way for...

Review by Ian Mosby


Review

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las: Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom

Standing Up with Ga’axsta’las; Jane Constance Cook and the Politics of Memory, Church, and Custom follows one woman’s involvement with “colonial interventions” (407) into Kwa’waka’wakw economics, government, and religion in the late nineteenth and early...

Review by Andrew Cienski


Review

Imagining Uplands: John Olmsted’s Masterpiece of Residential Design

This is a most handsome book, and a most intelligent analysis of the dense process of realizing a design concept. Larry McCann has allowed his telling of the Uplands history to be imaginative, if not...

Review by Rhodri Windsor Liscombe


Review

Through an Unknown Country: The Jarvis-Hanington Winter Expedition through the Northern Rockies, 1874-1875

This miscellany of writings, chiefly by two civil engineers who for parts of their careers  toiled as railway surveyors, aims to carve out a prominent place for them in the history of Canada. Ed Jarvis...

Review by I.S. MacLaren


Review

Georgia Straight: A 50th Anniversary Celebration and City on Edge: A Rebellious Century of Vancouver Protests, Riots, and Strikes

Vancouver has always had a volatile streak; it’s a key ingredient of the city’s identity, a theme in the story Vancouverites tell themselves about their place in the world. Perhaps political polarization, western alienation, protests,...

Review by Lani Russwurm


Review

The Bastard of Fort Stikine: The Hudson’s Bay Company and the Murder of John McLoughlin, Jr.

  During his round-the-world voyage in 1842, Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) Governor George Simpson arrived at Fort Stikine and discovered that chief trader John McLoughlin Jr. had been killed. Two recent books discuss this event....

Review by Corey Larson


Review

From a Victorian Garden: Creating the Romance of a Bygone Age Right in Your Own Backyard

GARDENS ARE EPHEMERAL, constantly changing and easily lost after only a few years of neglect. The Point Ellice House in Victoria, British Columbia, is an exceptional historic site where the gardens, with original, plantings now...

Review by Brenda Peterson


Review

Britannia’s Navy, On the West Coast of North America 1812 – 1914

This handsome volume, published in hardback with a blue and white dust-cover (featuring E. P. Bedwell’s 1862 painting of the steam-sloop HMS Plumper on the front and a photograph of HMCS Rainbow in Esquimalt, January...

Review by Alexander Howlett


Review

Far West: The Story of British Columbia

When I received this book by this popular and prolific writer, I thought it was a coffee table history of British Columbia. While Far West is large and glossy, I quickly realized that BC Studies...

Review by Robert Campbell


Review

The Land of Heart’s Delight: Early Maps and Charts of Vancouver Island

As a subject for cartography and historical geography, Vancouver Island has many attractions. Islands are uniquely advantaged in this regard, bordered as they are by waters and seas. The Enlightenment demanded scientific designations and definitions...

Review by Barry Gough


Review

Review

The Forgotten Explorer: Samuel Prescott Fay’s 1914 Expedition to the Northern Rockies

  In 1914, Samuel Prescott Fay (1884- 1971), a Harvard graduate from Boston, ventured twelve hundred kilometres through the northern Rockies from Jasper to Hudson’s Hope. While the Harvard Travelers Club deferred exploration in the...

Review by PearlAnn Reichwein


Review

The Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway: The Dunsmuir Years: 1884-1905

Originally, Robert Dunsmuir, the founder of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway (E&N), had intended the southern terminus to be Esquimalt and the northern terminus to be Nanaimo, as the name suggests, but before he had...

Review by Bruce Hodding


Review

The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest

Barry Gough has masterfully grappled with the challenge of interpreting an important figure in the Canadian fur trade in his book, The Elusive Mr. Pond: The Soldier, Fur Trader and Explorer who Opened the Northwest....

Review by George Colpitts


Review

Arthur Erickson: An Architect’s Life

David Stouck has written a remarkable history. More than a biography, it is an encompassing account of a remarkable figure in later modern Canadian and international cultural history. Stouck recovers the spirit and material record...

Review by Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe